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Electrification and energy productivity

  • Enflo, Kerstin
  • Kander, Astrid
  • Schön, Lennart

Energy productivity is crucial for sustainable development. We use cointegration analyses to investigate the effect of electricity on energy productivity in Swedish industry from 1930 to 1990. Electricity augmented energy productivity in those industrial branches that used electricity for multiple purposes. This productivity effect goes beyond "book-keeping effects," i. e. it is not only the result of electricity being produced in one sector (taking the energy transformation losses) and consumed in another (receiving the benefits).

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 68 (2009)
Issue (Month): 11 (September)
Pages: 2808-2817

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2009:i:11:p:2808-2817
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