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Does the availability of parental health insurance affect the college enrollment decision of young Americans?

  • Jung, Juergen
  • Hall, Diane M. Harnek
  • Rhoads, Thomas

The present study examines whether the college enrollment decision of young individuals (student full-time, student part-time, and non-student) depends on health insurance coverage via a parent's family health plan. Our findings indicate that the availability of parental health insurance can have significant effects on the probability that a young individual enrolls as a full-time student. A young individual who has access to health insurance via a parent can be up to 22% more likely to enroll as a full-time student than an individual without parental health insurance. After controlling for unobserved heterogeneity this probability drops to 5.5% but is still highly significant. We also find that the marginal effect of the availability of parental health insurance has a larger effect on older students between ages 21 and 23. We provide a brief discussion about possible implications of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 in this context.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 32 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 49-65

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:32:y:2013:i:c:p:49-65
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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