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Teacher MA attainment rates, 1970-2000

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  • Larsen, S. Eric

Abstract

The share of female teachers in the U.S. with an MA more than doubled between 1970 and 2000. This increase is puzzling, as it is much larger than that of other college-educated women, and it occurred over a period of declining teacher aptitude. I estimate the contribution of changes in teacher demographic characteristics, increases in the returns to an MA, and changes in teacher certification requirements to increases in teacher MA attainment rates. I find that the majority of the rise in attainment not attributable to secular trends and increases in the average age of teachers can be explained by increases in the returns to an MA among teachers. The increase in MA returns among teachers presents a second puzzle, as there is little evidence that master's degrees increase teacher productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Larsen, S. Eric, 2010. "Teacher MA attainment rates, 1970-2000," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 772-782, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:5:p:772-782
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven G. Rivkin & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain, 2005. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 417-458, March.
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    6. Caroline M. Hoxby & Andrew Leigh, 2004. "Pulled Away or Pushed Out? Explaining the Decline of Teacher Aptitude in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 236-240, May.
    7. Player, Daniel, 2009. "Monetary returns to academic ability in the public teacher labor market," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 277-285, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Cebula & Franklin Mixon & Mark Montez, 2015. "Teachers’ salaries and human capital, and their effects on academic performance: an institution-level analysis of Los Angeles County high schools," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(2), pages 347-356, April.

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