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Can't get there from here: The decision to apply to a selective college

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  • Griffith, Amanda L.
  • Rothstein, Donna S.

Abstract

In an attempt to increase applications from low-income students, some selective 4-year colleges are developing programs to target and attract low-income students. However, relatively little research has looked at factors important in the college application process, and in particular, how these factors differ for low-income students. This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to analyze factors influencing students' college application decisions, with a focus on the decision to apply to a selective 4-year college. We hypothesize that distance from a student's home to selective colleges may play a role in the application decision and differentially impact low-income students. Our results suggest that distance does matter, although the effects do not vary by family income level.

Suggested Citation

  • Griffith, Amanda L. & Rothstein, Donna S., 2009. "Can't get there from here: The decision to apply to a selective college," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 620-628, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:28:y:2009:i:5:p:620-628
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Educational economics School choice;

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