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Affordability: Family Incomes and Net Prices at Highly Selective Private Colleges and Universities

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  • Gordon C. Winston
  • Catharine B. Hill
  • Stephanie Boyd

Abstract

Working from the financial aid records of individual students at 28 highly selective private colleges and universities, we were able to calculate both the price the low-income students at these schools actually pay for a year’s education,net of financial aid grants, and how the schools differentiate net price in recognition of their students’ different family incomes—their pricing policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Gordon C. Winston & Catharine B. Hill & Stephanie Boyd, 2003. "Affordability: Family Incomes and Net Prices at Highly Selective Private Colleges and Universities," Williams Project on the Economics of Higher Education DP-66, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jan 2004.
  • Handle: RePEc:wil:wilehe:66
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gordon C. Winston & Jared C. Carbone & Laurie C. Hurshman, 2001. "Saving, Wealth, Performance, and Revenues in US Colleges and Universities," Williams Project on the Economics of Higher Education DP-59, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    2. Gordon C. Winston, 1999. "Subsidies, Hierarchy and Peers: The Awkward Economics of Higher Education," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 13-36, Winter.
    3. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Daniel R. Sherman, 1984. "Optimal Financial Aid Policies for a Selective University," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(2), pages 202-230.
    4. Thomas J. Kane, 1995. "Rising Public College Tuition and College Entry: How Well Do Public Subsidies Promote Access to College?," NBER Working Papers 5164, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Christopher Avery & Caroline Minter Hoxby, 2004. "Do and Should Financial Aid Packages Affect Students' College Choices?," NBER Chapters,in: College Choices: The Economics of Where to Go, When to Go, and How to Pay For It, pages 239-302 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gordon C. Winston & Ethan G. Lewis, 1997. "Physical Capital and Capital Service Costs in U.S. Colleges and Universities: 1993," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 165-189, Spring.
    7. Richard Steinberg & Burton A. Weisbrod, "undated". "Pricing and Rationing by Nonprofit Organizations with Distributional Objectives," IPR working papers 97-28, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shao, Ling, 2014. "Estimating the relationship between calculated financial need and actual aid received using quarter of birth instruments," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 165-174.
    2. Amanda Pallais, 2015. "Small Differences That Matter: Mistakes in Applying to College," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 493-520.
    3. Hashem Dezhbakhsh & John A. Karikari, 2010. "Enrollment At Highly Selective Private Colleges: Who Is Left Behind?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(1), pages 94-109, January.
    4. Kim, Matthew, 2010. "Early decision and financial aid competition among need-blind colleges and universities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(5-6), pages 410-420, June.
    5. Su Jin Jez, 2008. "The Influence of Wealth and Race in Four-Year College Attendance," University of California at Berkeley, Center for Studies in Higher Education qt0cc2x5tj, Center for Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley.
    6. Griffith, Amanda L. & Rothstein, Donna S., 2009. "Can't get there from here: The decision to apply to a selective college," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 620-628, October.
    7. DANIEL P. McMILLEN & LARRY D. SINGELL & GLEN R. WADDELL, 2007. "Spatial Competition And The Price Of College," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 817-833, October.
    8. repec:spr:reihed:v:58:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s11162-016-9443-x is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Shomon Shamsuddin, 2016. "Berkeley or Bust? Estimating the Causal Effect of College Selectivity on Bachelor’s Degree Completion," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 57(7), pages 795-822, November.

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