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How do young people choose college majors?

Listed author(s):
  • Montmarquette, Claude
  • Cannings, Kathy
  • Mahseredjian, Sophie

Previous studies on the determinants of the choice of college major have assumed a constant probability of sucess across majors or a constant earnings streamacross majors. Our model disregards these two restrictive assumptions in computing an expected earnings variable to explain the probability that student will choose a specific major among four choices of concentrations.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272-7757(01)00054-1
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 21 (2002)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 543-556

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:21:y:2002:i:6:p:543-556
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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    • Engle, Robert F & Hendry, David F & Richard, Jean-Francois, 1983. "Exogeneity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 277-304, March.
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  2. Manski, C.F., 1991. "Adolescent Econometricians : How Do Youth Infer the Returns to Schooling," Working papers 9110, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  3. Peter Rupert & Mark E. Schweitzer & Eric Severance-Lossin & Erin Turner, 1996. "Earnings, education and experience," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q IV, pages 2-12.
  4. Francine D. Blau & Marianne A. Ferber, 1991. "Career Plans and Expectations of Young Women and Men: The Earnings Gap and Labor Force Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(4), pages 581-607.
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  6. Jack Fiorito & Robert C. Dauffenbach, 1982. "Market and Nonmarket Influences on Curriculum Choice by College Students," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 36(1), pages 88-101, October.
  7. Cannings, K. & Montmarquette, C. & Mahseredjian, S., 1994. "Major Choice: Undergraduate Concentrations and the Probability of Graduation," Cahiers de recherche 9419, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  8. Paglin, Morton & Rufolo, Anthony M, 1990. "Heterogeneous Human Capital, Occupational Choice, and Male-Female Earnings Differences," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages 123-144, January.
  9. Orazem, Peter F & Mattila, J Peter, 1986. "Occupational Entry and Uncertainty: Males Leaving High School," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(2), pages 265-273, May.
  10. Kodde, David A, 1986. "Uncertainty and the Demand for Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(3), pages 460-467, August.
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  12. Rogers, Alan R, 1994. "Evolution of Time Preference by Natural Selection," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 460-481, June.
  13. Polachek, Solomon William, 1981. "Occupational Self-Selection: A Human Capital Approach to Sex Differences in Occupational Structure," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(1), pages 60-69, February.
  14. Hartog, Joop & Pfann, Gerard & Ridder, Geert, 1989. "(Non-)graduation and the earnings function : An inquiry on self-selection," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1373-1395, September.
  15. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-512, March.
  16. Blakemore, Arthur E & Low, Stuart A, 1984. "Sex Differences in Occupational Selection: The Case of College Majors," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(1), pages 157-163, February.
  17. Altonji, Joseph G, 1993. "The Demand for and Return to Education When Education Outcomes Are Uncertain," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 48-83, January.
  18. Rumberger, Russell W. & Thomas, Scott L., 1993. "The economic returns to college major, quality and performance: A multilevel analysis of recent graduates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 1-19, March.
  19. Stern, David & Paik, IL-Woo & Catterali, James S. & Nakata, Yoshi-Fumi, 1989. "Labor market experience of teenagers with and without high school diplomas," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 233-246, June.
  20. Berger, Mark C., 1988. "Cohort size effects on earnings: Differences by college major," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 375-383, August.
  21. Rumberger, Russell W., 1984. "The changing economic benefits of college graduates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 3-11, February.
  22. Julian R. Betts, 1996. "What Do Students Know about Wages? Evidence from a Survey of Undergraduates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(1), pages 27-56.
  23. Sarah E. Turner & William G. Bowen, 1999. "Choice of Major: The Changing (Unchanging) Gender Gap," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(2), pages 289-313, January.
  24. Saul Hoffman & Greg Duncan, 1988. "Multinomial and conditional logit discrete-choice models in demography," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 25(3), pages 415-427, August.
  25. Zalokar, Nadja, 1988. "Male-Female Differences in Occupational Choice and the Demand for General and Occupation-Specific Human Capital," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(1), pages 59-74, January.
  26. Flyer, Fredrick A, 1997. "The Influence of Higher Moments of Earnings Distributions on Career Decisions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(4), pages 689-713, October.
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