IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecmode/v60y2017icp39-50.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Effects of education externalities on schooling

Author

Listed:
  • Fukumura, Koichi

Abstract

In some developed countries, such as Japan and Sweden, the number of years of education does not predict wage differences as opposed to in some countries such as the United States and Germany. To explain such seemingly contradictory observations, this study develops a simple model utilizing the ‘keeping up with Joneses’ effect regarding schooling decisions. The main result of this study is that the model can have multiple equilibria, which can explain the difference between the two groups of countries. Moreover, efficiency analysis reveals that changes in the strength of education reference and psychological cost parameters can alter the welfare ranking of multiple equilibria.

Suggested Citation

  • Fukumura, Koichi, 2017. "Effects of education externalities on schooling," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 39-50.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:39-50
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2016.08.021
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264999316302516
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Antonio Ciccone & Giovanni Peri, 2006. "Identifying Human-Capital Externalities: Theory with Applications," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(2), pages 381-412.
    2. Abel, Andrew B, 1990. "Asset Prices under Habit Formation and Catching Up with the Joneses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 38-42, May.
    3. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
    4. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    5. Alonso-Carrera, Jaime & Caballé, Jordi & Raurich, Xavier, 2008. "Can consumption spillovers be a source of equilibrium indeterminacy?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 2883-2902, September.
    6. Philip A. Trostel, 2004. "Returns to scale in producing human capital from schooling," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(3), pages 461-484, July.
    7. Kazuo Mino, 2008. "Growth And Bubbles With Consumption Externalities," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 59(1), pages 33-53, March.
    8. Bill Dupor & Wen-Fang Liu, 2003. "Jealousy and Equilibrium Overconsumption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 423-428, March.
    9. Antoni Calvó-Armengol & Eleonora Patacchini & Yves Zenou, 2009. "Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(4), pages 1239-1267.
    10. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Perroni, Carlo, 1995. "Assessing the Dynamic Efficiency Gains of Tax Reform When Human Capital Is Endogenous," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(4), pages 907-925, November.
    12. Caucutt, Elizabeth M. & Kumar, Krishna B., 2003. "Higher education subsidies and heterogeneity: a dynamic analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1459-1502, June.
    13. Hashimoto, Keiji & Heath, Julia A., 1995. "Income elasticities of educational expenditure by income class: The case of Japanese households," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 63-71, March.
    14. Frederic Tournemaine & Christopher Tsoukis, 2015. "Public Expenditures, Growth, and Distribution in a Mixed Regime of Education with a Status Motive," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(5), pages 673-701, October.
    15. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, March.
    16. Harald Uhlig & Lars Ljungqvist, 2000. "Tax Policy and Aggregate Demand Management under Catching Up with the Joneses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 356-366, June.
    17. Liu, Wen-Fang & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2005. "Consumption externalities, production externalities, and long-run macroeconomic efficiency," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 1097-1129, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Guarini, Giulio & Laureti, Tiziana & Garofalo, Giuseppe, 2018. "Territorial and individual educational inequality: A Capability Approach analysis for Italy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 247-262.
    2. Lu, Chia-Hui, 2018. "Social status, compulsory education, and growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 425-434.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Externality; Social preference; Multiple equilibria;

    JEL classification:

    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:39-50. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.