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The effects of education externality on schooling

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  • Koichi Fukumura

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

Abstract

This study theoretically investigates the effects of educational envy on schooling decisions. I develop a model where in workers enjoy utility from their levels of education and consumption. Moreover, worker fs utility also depends on other worker fs education levels, i.e., we assume the gkeeping up with Joneses h effect in education. The main result of this study is that such envy causes workers to make decisions on education level that differ from the decision made when envy is not considered. This result can explain the United States-Japan differences in the relationship between wages and schooling decisions. Analysis from a social planner fs perspective reveals that certain conditions on parameters can change the social preferences for the education level selected by individuals. Moreover, the model indicates that the economy may be overeducated in terms of the education for education fs sake situation.

Suggested Citation

  • Koichi Fukumura, 2015. "The effects of education externality on schooling," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 15-05, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:1505
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    File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/1505.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Abel, Andrew B, 1990. "Asset Prices under Habit Formation and Catching Up with the Joneses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 38-42, May.
    2. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    3. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 1-9.
    4. Alonso-Carrera, Jaime & Caballé, Jordi & Raurich, Xavier, 2008. "Can consumption spillovers be a source of equilibrium indeterminacy?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 2883-2902, September.
    5. Moretti, Enrico, 2004. "Estimating the social return to higher education: evidence from longitudinal and repeated cross-sectional data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 175-212.
    6. Philip A. Trostel, 2004. "Returns to scale in producing human capital from schooling," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(3), pages 461-484, July.
    7. Antoni Calvó-Armengol & Eleonora Patacchini & Yves Zenou, 2009. "Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(4), pages 1239-1267.
    8. Jacob Mincer, 1958. "Investment in Human Capital and Personal Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 281-281.
    9. Hashimoto, Keiji & Heath, Julia A., 1995. "Income elasticities of educational expenditure by income class: The case of Japanese households," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 63-71, March.
    10. Harald Uhlig & Lars Ljungqvist, 2000. "Tax Policy and Aggregate Demand Management under Catching Up with the Joneses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 356-366, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Externality; Social preference; Multiple equilibria;

    JEL classification:

    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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