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Social status, compulsory education, and growth

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  • Lu, Chia-Hui

Abstract

In the long run, if agents pay more attention to social status, the time allocated to higher education and economic growth both increase. However, if the education provided by the government is less efficient than that provided by the private sector, a longer period of compulsory education not only decreases the time allocated to higher education, but also reduces the total time spent in education. Therefore, economic growth declines because of the greater amount of inefficient education provided by the government.

Suggested Citation

  • Lu, Chia-Hui, 2018. "Social status, compulsory education, and growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 425-434.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:425-434
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2017.08.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social status; Compulsory education; Economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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