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Equity-financing, income inequality and capital accumulation


  • Nabi, Mahmoud Sami


The relationship between economic development and income inequality is not neutral vis-à-vis the role of the financial system in responding to the needs of different categories of agents. The literature on persistent inequality shows that taking account of the asymmetric impact of financial imperfections on wealthy and poor agents changes — the Kuznets (1955) relationship between economic development and income inequality. The present paper analyses the effect of equity-based financial intermediation on the evolution of the capital accumulation/income inequality relationship. It is interesting that income inequality disappears when the economy reaches an advanced stage of development, despite the existence of credit market imperfections.

Suggested Citation

  • Nabi, Mahmoud Sami, 2015. "Equity-financing, income inequality and capital accumulation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 322-333.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:46:y:2015:i:c:p:322-333 DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2014.12.030

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    References listed on IDEAS

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