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Market efficiency and learning in an endogenously unstable environment

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  • Goldbaum, David

Abstract

A least-squares model governs the learning process as traders attempt to extract private information from the market price of an asset. Replicator dynamics govern the evolution of the popularity of this strategy against the alternative, directly acquiring the private information through research. The lack of a fixed point to the dual dynamics embodies the Grossman and Stiglitz (1980) impossibility of informationally efficient markets. The asymptotic behavior of the system has the model switching between price stability and instability, endogenously generating noise in the price. The asymptotic behavior is the same when all traders access and employ both fundamental and market information.
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Suggested Citation

  • Goldbaum, David, 2005. "Market efficiency and learning in an endogenously unstable environment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 953-978, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:29:y:2005:i:5:p:953-978
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Diks, Cees & Dindo, Pietro, 2008. "Informational differences and learning in an asset market with boundedly rational agents," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1432-1465, May.
    2. Goldbaum, David, 2017. "Divergent Behavior in Markets with Idiosyncratic Private Information," Review of Behavioral Economics, now publishers, vol. 4(2), pages 181-213, September.
    3. Hommes, Cars, 2011. "The heterogeneous expectations hypothesis: Some evidence from the lab," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-24, January.
    4. David Goldbaum, 2003. "Profitable technical trading rules as a source of price instability," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 220-229.
    5. Goldbaum, David, 2006. "Self-organization and the persistence of noise in financial markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(9-10), pages 1837-1855.
    6. Hommes, Cars H., 2006. "Heterogeneous Agent Models in Economics and Finance," Handbook of Computational Economics, in: Leigh Tesfatsion & Kenneth L. Judd (ed.),Handbook of Computational Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 23, pages 1109-1186, Elsevier.
    7. Brock, W.A. & Hommes, C.H. & Wagener, F.O.O., 2009. "More hedging instruments may destabilize markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1912-1928, November.
    8. Hommes, C.H. & Wagener, F.O.O., 2008. "Complex evolutionary systems in behavioral finance," CeNDEF Working Papers 08-05, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
    9. David Goldbaum, 2004. "On the Possibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 139, Society for Computational Economics.
    10. David Goldbaum, 2013. "Learning and Adaptation as a Source of Market Failure," Working Paper Series 14, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    11. Hommes, C.H., 2005. "Heterogeneous Agent Models in Economics and Finance, In: Handbook of Computational Economics II: Agent-Based Computational Economics, edited by Leigh Tesfatsion and Ken Judd , Elsevier, Amsterdam 2006," CeNDEF Working Papers 05-03, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
    12. Goldbaum, David & Panchenko, Valentyn, 2010. "Learning and adaptation's impact on market efficiency," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 635-653, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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