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Housing demand in Shanghai: A discrete choice approach

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  • Han, Xuehui

Abstract

In this study we apply a random utility modeling framework to analyze housing demand in the city of Shanghai. A Multinomial Logit Model taking account of latent choice sets is employed to investigate the impact of household characteristics, such as income, size and age composition, on the choice of dwelling, specified by location, size and unit price. In addition to the price and income effects on housing demand, the model identifies a quality indicator for dwelling attributes, which can be interpreted as the mean attractiveness in a money metric measure. The data used in this study are cross-sectional survey data. The estimated model is used to calculate demand elasticities and demand probabilities, for selected groups of households and types of dwellings. Among the results can be noted that the price-income ratios, the age composition and size of household are all important determinants of the demand. The impact of income distribution on housing demand is also studied.

Suggested Citation

  • Han, Xuehui, 2010. "Housing demand in Shanghai: A discrete choice approach," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 355-376, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:21:y:2010:i:2:p:355-376
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borsch-supan, Axel & Pitkin, John, 1988. "On discrete choice models of housing demand," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 153-172, September.
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    4. Aaberge, Rolf & Colombino, Ugo & Strom, Steinar, 1999. "Labour Supply in Italy: An Empirical Analysis of Joint Household Decisions, with Taxes and Quantity Constraints," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 403-422, July-Aug..
    5. Steinar StrØm & John K. Dagsvik, 2006. "Sectoral labour supply, choice restrictions and functional form," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 803-826.
    6. Dagsvik, John K, 1994. "Discrete and Continuous Choice, Max-Stable Processes, and Independence from Irrelevant Attributes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(5), pages 1179-1205, September.
    7. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132-132.
    8. Harold W. Elder & Leonard V. Zumpano, 1991. "Tenure Choice, Housing Demand, and Residential Location," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 6(3), pages 341-356.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ali Osman Solak & Burhan Kabadayi, 2016. "Bounds Testing Approaches to Housing Demand in Turkey: Is There a Real Estate Bubble?," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 1132-1135.
    2. Yuan Cheng & Xuehui Han, 2013. "Does large volatility help?—stochastic population forecasting technology in explaining real estate price process," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 323-356, January.
    3. Ömer ALKAN & Abdulkerim KARAASLAN & Hayri ABAR & Ali Kemal ÇELIK & Erkan OKTAY, 2014. "Factors Affecting Motives For Housing Demand: The Case Of A Turkish Province," Theoretical and Empirical Researches in Urban Management, Research Centre in Public Administration and Public Services, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 9(3), pages 70-86, August.
    4. Ng, Eric C.Y., 2015. "Housing market dynamics in China: Findings from an estimated DSGE model," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 26-40.
    5. Xuehui Han & Yuan Cheng, 2017. "Consumption- and Productivity-Adjusted Dependency Ratio with Household Structure Heterogeneity," Working Papers id:12339, eSocialSciences.
    6. Akbar, Delwar & Rolfe, John & Kabir, S.M. Zobaidul, 2013. "Predicting impacts of major projects on housing prices in resource based towns with a case study application to Gladstone, Australia," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 481-489.
    7. Wen-Chi LIU, 2016. "Do Multiple Housing Bubbles Exist in China? Further Evidence from Generalized Sup ADF Tests," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 135-145, December.
    8. Yuan Cheng & John K. Dagsvik & Xuehui Han, 2014. "Real Estate Market Policy and Household Demand for Housing," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(2), pages 237-253, May.
    9. Iris Claus & Les Oxley & Jie Chen & Xuehui Han, 2014. "The Evolution Of The Housing Market And Its Socioeconomic Impacts In The Post-Reform People'S Republic Of China: A Survey Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(4), pages 652-670, September.
    10. Ren, Yu & Xiong, Cong & Yuan, Yufei, 2012. "House price bubbles in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 786-800.
    11. repec:wyi:journl:002167 is not listed on IDEAS

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