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Co-effects of climate policy and agricultural policy on regional agricultural viability in Finland


  • Lehtonen, Heikki
  • Peltola, Jukka
  • Sinkkonen, Marko


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  • Lehtonen, Heikki & Peltola, Jukka & Sinkkonen, Marko, 2006. "Co-effects of climate policy and agricultural policy on regional agricultural viability in Finland," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 88(2-3), pages 472-493, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:88:y:2006:i:2-3:p:472-493

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. RICHARD M. Adams & DARIUS M. Adams & JOHN M. Callaway & CHING-CHENG Chang & BRUCE A. Mccarl, 1993. "Sequestering Carbon On Agricultural Land: Social Cost And Impacts On Timber Markets," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 11(1), pages 76-87, January.
    2. Tschakert, Petra, 2004. "The costs of soil carbon sequestration: an economic analysis for small-scale farming systems in Senegal," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 227-253, September.
    3. Robert N. Stavins, 1999. "The Costs of Carbon Sequestration: A Revealed-Preference Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 994-1009, September.
    4. Peter J. Parks & Ian W. Hardie, 1995. "Least-Cost Forest Carbon Reserves: Cost-Effective Subsidies to Convert Marginal Agricultural Land to Forests," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(1), pages 122-136.
    5. Jussi Lankoski & Markku Ollikainen, 2003. "Agri-environmental externalities: a framework for designing targeted policies," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 51-75, March.
    6. Arild Vatn, 2002. "Multifunctional agriculture: some consequences for international trade regimes," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 309-327, July.
    7. Thomas L. Cox & Jean-Paul Chavas, 2001. "An Interregional Analysis of Price Discrimination and Domestic Policy Reform in the U.S. Dairy Sector," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 89-106.
    8. Suzi Kerr & Shuguang Liu & Alexander S. P. Pfaff & R. Flint Hughes, 2003. "Carbon Dynamics and Land-Use Choices: Building a Regional-Scale Multidisciplinary Model," Working Papers 03_06, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    9. Soete, Luc & Turner, Roy, 1984. "Technology Diffusion and the Rate of Technical Change," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(375), pages 612-623, September.
    10. J. Callaway & Bruce McCarl, 1996. "The economic consequences of substituting carbon payments for crop subsidies in U.S. agriculture," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(1), pages 15-43, January.
    11. S De Cara & P-A Jayet, 2000. "Emissions of greenhouse gases from agriculture: the heterogeneity of abatement costs in France," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 281-303, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hediger, Werner, 2009. "The non-permanence of optimal soil carbon sequestration," 83rd Annual Conference, March 30-April 1, 2009, Dublin, Ireland 51057, Agricultural Economics Society.
    2. Michael Hartmann & Werner Hediger & Simon Peter, 2008. "How Much Should Swiss Farmers Contribute to Greenhouse Gas Reduction? A Meta-Analytical Approach," Journal of Socio-Economics in Agriculture (Until 2015: Yearbook of Socioeconomics in Agriculture), Swiss Society for Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, vol. 1(1), pages 183-218.
    3. Eric Audsley & Mirek Trnka & Santiago Sabaté & Joan Maspons & Anabel Sanchez & Daniel Sandars & Jan Balek & Kerry Pearn, 2015. "Interactively modelling land profitability to estimate European agricultural and forest land use under future scenarios of climate, socio-economics and adaptation," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 128(3), pages 215-227, February.
    4. Britz, Wolfgang & Heckelei, Thomas, 2008. "Recent Developments In Eu Policies – Challenges For Partial Equilibrium Models," 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain 6315, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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