IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/agecon/v29y2003i2p181-193.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Energy substitutability in transition agriculture: estimates and implications for Hungary

Author

Listed:
  • Shankar, Bhavani
  • Piesse, Jenifer
  • Thirtle, Colin

Abstract

Subsidised energy prices in pre-transition Hungary had led to excessive energy intensity in the agricultural sector. Transition has resulted in steep input price increases. In this study, Allen and Morishima elasticities of substitution are estimated to study the effects of these price changes on energy use, chemical input use, capital formation and employment. Panel data methods, Generalised Method of Moments (GMM) and instrument exogeneity tests are used to specify and estimate technology and substitution elasticities. Results indicate that indirect price policy may be effective in controlling energy consumption. The sustained increases in energy and chemical input prices have worked together to restrict energy and chemical input use, and the substitutability between energy, capital and labour has prevented the capital shrinkage and agricultural unemployment situations from being worse. The Hungarian push towards lower energy intensity may be best pursued through sustained energy price increases rather than capital subsidies. © 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Shankar, Bhavani & Piesse, Jenifer & Thirtle, Colin, 2003. "Energy substitutability in transition agriculture: estimates and implications for Hungary," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 29(2), pages 181-193, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:29:y:2003:i:2:p:181-193
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169-5150(03)00047-1
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bronwyn H. Hall, 1992. "Investment and Research and Development at the Firm Level: Does the Source of Financing Matter?," NBER Working Papers 4096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mathijs, Erik & Swinnen, Johan F M, 1998. "The Economics of Agricultural Decollectivization in East Central Europe and the Former Soviet Union," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(1), pages 1-26, October.
    3. Trzeciak-Duval, Alexandra, 1999. "A Decade of Transition in Central and Eastern European Agriculture," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 26(3), pages 283-304, August.
    4. Charles Blackorby & R. Robert Russell, 1981. "The Morishima Elasticity of Substitution; Symmetry, Constancy, Separability, and its Relationship to the Hicks and Allen Elasticities," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(1), pages 147-158.
    5. Keane, Michael P & Runkle, David E, 1992. "On the Estimation of Panel-Data Models with Serial Correlation When Instruments Are Not Strictly Exogenous: Reply," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(1), pages 26-29, January.
    6. Caselli, Francesco & Esquivel, Gerardo & Lefort, Fernando, 1996. "Reopening the Convergence Debate: A New Look at Cross-Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 363-389, September.
    7. Blackorby, Charles & Russell, R Robert, 1989. "Will the Real Elasticity of Substitution Please Stand Up? (A Comparison of the Allen/Uzawa and Morishima Elasticities)," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 882-888, September.
    8. Macours, Karen & Swinnen, Johan F. M., 2000. "Causes of Output Decline in Economic Transition: The Case of Central and Eastern European Agriculture," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 172-206, March.
    9. Hisnanick, John J. & Kyer, Ben L., 1995. "Assessing a disaggregated energy input : Using confidence intervals around translog elasticity estimates," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 125-132, April.
    10. Thompson, Peter & Taylor, Timothy G, 1995. "The Capital-Energy Substitutability Debate: A New Look," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(3), pages 565-569, August.
    11. Humphrey, David Burras & Moroney, John R, 1975. "Substitution among Capital, Labor, and Natural Resource Products in American Manufacturing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(1), pages 57-82, February.
    12. Bregman, Arie & Fuss, Melvyn & Regev, Haim, 1995. "The production and cost structure of Israeli industry Evidence from individual firm data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 45-81, January.
    13. Sang V Nguyen & Mary L Streitwieser, 1997. "Capital-Energy Substitution Revisted: New Evidence From Micro Data," Working Papers 97-4, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    14. Chamberlain, Gary, 1982. "Multivariate regression models for panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 5-46, January.
    15. Keane, Michael P & Runkle, David E, 1992. "On the Estimation of Panel-Data Models with Serial Correlation When Instruments Are Not Strictly Exogenous," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(1), pages 1-9, January.
    16. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    17. ZELLNER, Arnold & KMENTA, Jan & DREZE, Jacques H., 1966. "Specification and estimation of Cobb-Douglas production function models," CORE Discussion Papers RP 12, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    18. Y. Mundlak, 1968. "Elasticities of Substitution and the Theory of Derived Demand," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 225-236.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Radoslaw Stefanski, 2014. "Structural Transformation and the Oil Price," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(3), pages 484-504, July.
    2. Patlitzianas, Konstantinos D. & Kagiannas, Argyris G. & Askounis, Dimitris Th. & Psarras, John, 2005. "The policy perspective for RES development in the new member states of the EU," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 477-492.
    3. Banda, Benjamin M. & Hassan, Rashid M., 2011. "Inter-fuel substitution and dynamic adjustment in input demand: Implications for deforestation and carbon emission in Malawi," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 6(1), March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:29:y:2003:i:2:p:181-193. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/agec .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.