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Smooth transition in China: New evidence in the cointegrating money demand relationship

Author

Listed:
  • Anne laure Delatte

    () (Rouen Business School)

  • Julien Fouquau

    () (Rouen Business School and LEO)

Abstract

Using linearity tests proposed by Choi and Saikkonen (2004), this paper finds evidence of a non-linear cointegrating money demand relationship in China during the 1987-2008 period and identifies potential explanations for this non-linearity.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne laure Delatte & Julien Fouquau, 2010. "Smooth transition in China: New evidence in the cointegrating money demand relationship," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 265-273.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00767
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. In Choi & Pentti Saikkonen, 2004. "Testing linearity in cointegrating smooth transition regressions," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 7(2), pages 341-365, December.
    2. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    3. Dick van Dijk & Timo Terasvirta & Philip Hans Franses, 2002. "Smooth Transition Autoregressive Models — A Survey Of Recent Developments," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 1-47.
    4. Andrés González & Timo Teräsvirta & Dick van Dijk & Yukai Yang, 1910. "Panel Smooth Transition Regression Models," CREATES Research Papers 2017-36, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    5. Chien-Chiang Lee & Mei-Se Chien, 2008. "Stability of money demand function revisited in China," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(24), pages 3185-3197.
    6. Chow, Gregory C., 1987. "Money and price level determination in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 319-333, September.
    7. Jesús Gonzalo & Jean-Yves Pitarakis, 2006. "Threshold Effects in Cointegrating Relationships," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(s1), pages 813-833, December.
    8. MacKinnon, James G. & White, Halbert, 1985. "Some heteroskedasticity-consistent covariance matrix estimators with improved finite sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 305-325, September.
    9. Bernard J Laurens & Rodolfo Maino, 2007. "China; Strengthening Monetary Policy Implementation," IMF Working Papers 07/14, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fredj Jawadi & Sushanta K. Mallick & Ricardo M. Sousa, 2011. "Monetary Policy Rules in the BRICS: How Important is Nonlinearity?," NIPE Working Papers 18/2011, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    2. Delatte, Anne-Laure & Fouquau, Julien & Holz, Carsten, 2013. "Understanding Money Demand in the Transition from a Centrally Planned to a Market Economy," CEPR Discussion Papers 9721, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China Money Demand; Non-linearity; Cointegrating STR.;

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables

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