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Platform stickiness in a spatial voting model

Author

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  • Luca Lambertini

    () (Department of Economics, University of Bologna)

Abstract

The spatial voting approach is extended to account for the existence of a loyalty effect driving the choice of parties' platforms during elections. There emerges a non-linear relationship between these variable, whereby a party sticking to its historical heritage may lose to a rival more keen to approach the position of the median voter, whose pivotal role is also investigated.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca Lambertini, 2007. "Platform stickiness in a spatial voting model," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(40), pages 1-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07d70009
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    elections;

    JEL classification:

    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory

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