IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ebl/ecbull/eb-06l20001.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Exploring the Behavior of Economic Agents: the role of relative preferences

Author

Listed:
  • Joseph Cavanaugh

    () (Wright State University - LC)

  • Michelle Alexopoulos

    () (University of Toronto)

Abstract

Standard economic theory assumes individuals choose actions that optimize their expected utility. In this paper we investigate how the existence of players with non-standard preferences may influence economic agents' behavior in some of the most frequently studied non-cooperative games. We find that allowing for the existence of agents with relative preferences can help explain observed economic actions which, at times, appear counter-intuitive.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph Cavanaugh & Michelle Alexopoulos, 2006. "Exploring the Behavior of Economic Agents: the role of relative preferences," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 12(2), pages 1-7.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-06l20001
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2006/Volume12/EB-06L20001A.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Neumark, David & Postlewaite, Andrew, 1998. "Relative income concerns and the rise in married women's employment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 157-183, October.
    2. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
    3. George A. Akerlof & Janet L. Yellen, 1990. "The Fair Wage-Effort Hypothesis and Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 255-283.
    4. George A. Akerlof, 1982. "Labor Contracts as Partial Gift Exchange," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 97(4), pages 543-569.
    5. David K. Levine, 1998. "Modeling Altruism and Spitefulness in Experiment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(3), pages 593-622, July.
    6. Larry Samuelson, 2004. "Information-Based Relative Consumption Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 93-118, January.
    7. Akerlof, George A & Yellen, Janet L, 1988. "Fairness and Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 44-49, May.
    8. Otis Duncan, 1975. "Does money buy satisfaction?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 267-274, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. A. Mantovani & C. Vergari, 2013. "Hedonic vs Environmental Quality: Which Policy Can Help in Lowering Pollution Emissions?," Working Papers wp906, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    2. Andrea Mantovani & Ornella Tarola & Cecilia Vergari, 2014. "Hedonic quality, social norms, and environmental campaigns," Working Papers 2014/36, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    3. A. Mantovani & O. Tarola & C. Vergari, 2014. "On the effect of social norms to reduce pollution," Working Papers wp950, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    4. A. Mantovani & O. Tarola & C. Vergari, 2015. "Hedonic Quality and Social Norms: a hybrid model of product differentiation," Working Papers wp1029, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior
    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-06l20001. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.