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What drives Senegalese migration to Europe? The role of economic restructuring, labor demand, and the multiplier effect of networks

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  • Pau Baizán

    (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)

  • Amparo González-Ferrer

    (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC))

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Pau Baizán & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2016. "What drives Senegalese migration to Europe? The role of economic restructuring, labor demand, and the multiplier effect of networks," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(13), pages 339-380, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:35:y:2016:i:13
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol35/13/35-13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pau Baizán & Cris Beauchemin & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2014. "An Origin and Destination Perspective on Family Reunification: The Case of Senegalese Couples," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 65-87, February.
    2. Timothy J. Hatton & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2003. "Demographic and Economic Pressure on Emigration out of Africa," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(3), pages 465-486, September.
    3. Jean-Paul Azam, 2004. "Poverty and Growth in the WAEMU after the 1994 Devaluation," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 13(4), pages 536-562, December.
    4. Amparo González-Ferrer & Pau Baizán & Cris Beauchemin & Elisabeth Kraus & Bruno Schoumaker & Richard Black, 2014. "Distance, Transnational Arrangements, and Return Decisions of Senegalese, Ghanaian, and Congolese Migrants," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 939-971, December.
    5. Filiz Garip, 2008. "Social capital and migration: How do similar resources lead to divergent outcomes?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(3), pages 591-617, August.
    6. Jan Willem Gunning & Paul Collier, 1999. "Explaining African Economic Performance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 64-111, March.
    7. Philip L. Martin, 1993. "Trade and Migration: NAFTA and Agriculture," Peterson Institute Press: Policy Analyses in International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number PA 38, February.
    8. Frank Ellis, 2000. "The Determinants of Rural Livelihood Diversification in Developing Countries," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 289-302, May.
    9. Kaivan Munshi, 2003. "Networks in the Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants in the U. S. Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(2), pages 549-599.
    10. Robert E.B. Lucas, 2006. "Migration and Economic Development in Africa: A Review of Evidence," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(2), pages 337-395, December.
    11. Andrés Villarreal & Sarah Blanchard, 2013. "How Job Characteristics Affect International Migration: The Role of Informality in Mexico," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(2), pages 751-775, April.
    12. Valentina Mazzucato & Djamila Schans & Kim Caarls & Cris Beauchemin, 2015. "Transnational Families Between Africa and Europe," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 142-172, March.
    13. Mao-Mei Liu, 2013. "Migrant Networks and International Migration: Testing Weak Ties," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(4), pages 1243-1277, August.
    14. Hendrik Dalen & George Groenewold & Jeannette Schoorl, 2005. "Out of Africa: what drives the pressure to emigrate?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 741-778, November.
    15. Philip L. Martin, 1993. "Trade and Migration: NAFTA and Agriculture," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa38, January.
    16. Cris Beauchemin & Jocelyn Nappa & Bruno Schoumaker & Pau Baizan & Amparo González-Ferrer & Kim Caarls & Valentina Mazzucato, 2015. "Reunifying Versus Living Apart Together Across Borders: A Comparative Analysis of sub-Saharan Migration to Europe," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 173-199, March.
    17. Barrett, C. B. & Reardon, T. & Webb, P., 2001. "Nonfarm income diversification and household livelihood strategies in rural Africa: concepts, dynamics, and policy implications," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 315-331, August.
    18. Cris Beauchemin, 2014. "A Manifesto for Quantitative Multi-sited Approaches to International Migration," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 921-938, December.
    19. Sophia Rabe-Hesketh & Anders Skrondal, 2012. "Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, 3rd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 3, number mimus2, April.
    20. Weissman, Stephen R., 1990. "Structural adjustment in Africa: Insights from the experiences of Ghana and Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 18(12), pages 1621-1634, December.
    21. Mark Granovetter, 2005. "The Impact of Social Structure on Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 33-50, Winter.
    22. Arjan de Haan, 1999. "Livelihoods and poverty: The role of migration - a critical review of the migration literature," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 1-47.
    23. Cris Beauchemin & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2011. "Sampling international migrants with origin-based snowballing method: New evidence on biases and limitations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(3), pages 103-134, July.
    24. repec:bla:blaboo:1557860300 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966.
    26. Ognjen Obućina, 2013. "Occupational trajectories and occupational cost among Senegalese immigrants in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(19), pages 547-580, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Europe; international migration; labor demand; social capital; social institutions; sub-Saharan Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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