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Trends in healthy life expectancy in Japan: 1986 - 2004

Listed author(s):
  • Vanessa Yong

    (Nihon University)

  • Yasuhiko Saito

    (Nihon University)

Registered author(s):

    This article examines the increasing life expectancy of Japanese men and women in relation to their health from 1986 to 2004. We computed healthy life expectancy for seven available time-points using the prevalence-based Sullivan method. The results showed that, for both sexes and at all ages, the gains in life expectancy prior to 1995 were mostly in years of good self-rated health, while the gains thereafter were in years of poor self-rated health. The exception was for women at age 85, among whom there was an almost continuous increase in the number of years in poor health. The proportion of life spent in different health states suggested evidence of morbidity compression until 1995, followed by an expansion of morbidity.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/19/20-19.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 19 (April)
    Pages: 467-494

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:20:y:2009:i:19
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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