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Fertility decline in North-Central Namibia

Author

Listed:
  • Riikka Shemeikka

    (Helsingin Yliopisto (University of Helsinki))

  • Veijo Notkola

    (Helsingin Yliopisto (University of Helsinki))

  • Harri Siiskonen

    (Itä-Suomen Yliopisto (University of Eastern Finland))

Abstract

This study examines fertility decline in North-Central Namibia in the period 1960-2000. A Scandinavian-type parish-register system, established in the beginning of 20th Century and still in use, provided register-based data for fertility analysis. Fertility decline began in 1980, was rapid in the 1980s, levelled off in the early 1990s, started again in 1994 and continued until the year 2000. Fertility declined in every age group, except among the 15-19 year olds, whose fertility increased. Cohort fertility started to decline among the 1940-44 birth cohort. During the 1980s, fertility decline was associated with increasing age at first marriage and declining marital fertility, connected to e.g. the War of Independence. During the 1990s, an increase in both the use of contraceptives and HIV-prevalence contributed to the fertility decline.

Suggested Citation

  • Riikka Shemeikka & Veijo Notkola & Harri Siiskonen, 2005. "Fertility decline in North-Central Namibia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 13(4), pages 83-116.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:13:y:2005:i:4
    DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2005.13.4
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Victor Agadjanian & Ndola Prata, 2002. "War, peace, and fertility in Angola," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(2), pages 215-231, May.
    4. Wolfgang Lurz & Anne Goujon, 2001. "The World's Changing Human Capital Stock: Multi‐State Population Projections by Educational Attainment," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(2), pages 323-339, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    HIV/AIDS; contraceptive use; fertility decline; sub-Saharan Africa; cohort fertility; period fertility; Namibia; parish registers;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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