IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Placing the poor while keeping the rich in their place

  • Jonathan P. Caulkins

    (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh)

  • Gustav Feichtinger

    (Vienna University of Technology)

  • Dieter Grass

    (University of Technology, Vienna)

  • Michael Johnson

    (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh)

  • Gernot Tragler

    (University of Technology, Vienna)

  • Yuri Yegorov

    (Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna)

A central objective of modern US housing policy is deconcentrating poverty through "housing mobility programs" that move poor families into middle class neighborhoods. Pursuing these policies too aggressively risks inducing middle class flight, but being too cautious squanders the opportunity to help more poor families. This paper presents a stylized dynamicoptimization model that captures this tension. With base-caseparameter values, cost considerations limit mobility programs before flight becomes excessive. However, for modest departures reflecting stronger flight tendencies and/or weaker destination neighborhoods, other outcomes emerge. In particular, we find state-dependence and multiple equilibria, including both de-populated and oversized outcomes. For certain sets of parameters there exists a Skiba point that separates initial conditions for which the optimal strategy leads to substantial flight and depopulation from those for which the optimal strategy retains or even expands the middle class population. These results suggest the value of estimating middle-class neighborhoods' "carrying capacity" for absorbing mobility program placements and further modeling of dynamic response.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol13/1/13-1.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 13 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)
Pages: 1-34

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:13:y:2005:i:1
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. George Galster, 1988. "Residential segregation in American cities: A contrary review," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 93-112, May.
  2. Betts, Julian R. & Fairlie, Robert W., 2003. "Does immigration induce 'native flight' from public schools into private schools?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 987-1012, May.
  3. repec:att:wimass:9127 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Xavier de Souza Briggs, 2003. "Housing opportunity, desegregation strategy, and policy research," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 201-206.
  5. Galster, George, 2002. "An economic efficiency analysis of deconcentrating poverty populations," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 303-329, December.
  6. Robert Fairlie, 2002. "Private schools and “Latino flight” from black schoolchildren," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 655-674, November.
  7. Caulkins, Jonathan P. & Feichtinger, Gustav & Johnson, Michael & Tragler, Gernot & Yegorov, Yuri, 2005. "Skiba thresholds in a model of controlled migration," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 57(4), pages 490-508, August.
  8. Manski, Charles F, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 531-42, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:13:y:2005:i:1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Editorial Office)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.