IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/jpamgt/v20y2001i1p65-88.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Assessing the property value impacts of the dispersed subsidy housing program in Denver

Author

Listed:
  • Anna M Santiago

    (School of Social Work, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI)

  • George C Galster

    (College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitan Affairs, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI)

  • Peter Tatian

    (The Urban Institute, Washington, DC)

Abstract

This study tests the hypothesis that the acquisition of existing property by the public housing authority and its subsequent rehabilitation and occupancy by subsidized tenants significantly reduced the property values of surrounding single-family homes in Denver during the 1990s. This assessment examined pre- and post-occupancy sales, while controlling for the idiosyncratic neighborhood, local public service, and zoning characteristics of the areas in order to identify which sorts of neighborhoods, if any, experienced declining property values as a result of proximity to dispersed housing tenants. The analyses revealed that proximity to a subsidized housing site generally had an independent, positive effect on single-family home sales prices. The most notable exception to this pattern occurred in neighborhoods more than 20 percent of whose residents were black. Proximity to dispersed public housing sites in these neighborhoods resulted in slower growth in home sales prices in an other-wise booming housing market and suggest a threshold within “vulnerable” neighborhoods whereby any potential gains associated with rehabilitating existing units are offset by the increased concentration of poor residents. © 2001 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna M Santiago & George C Galster & Peter Tatian, 2001. "Assessing the property value impacts of the dispersed subsidy housing program in Denver," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 65-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:20:y:2001:i:1:p:65-88
    DOI: 10.1002/1520-6688(200124)20:1<65::AID-PAM1004>3.0.CO;2-U
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. DeSalvo, Joseph S., 1974. "Neighborhood upgrading effects of middle-income housing projects in New York City," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 269-277, July.
    2. Lyons, Robert F. & Loveridge, Scott, 1993. "An Hedonic Estimation Of The Effect Of Federally Subsidized Housing On Nearby Residential Property Values," Staff Papers 13377, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    3. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    4. Donald C. Guy & John L. Hysom & Stephen R. Ruth, 1985. "The Effect of Subsidized Housing on Values of Adjacent Housing," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 13(4), pages 378-387, December.
    5. Can, Ayse & Megbolugbe, Isaac, 1997. "Spatial Dependence and House Price Index Construction," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1-2), pages 203-222, Jan.-Marc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Robert Collinson & Ingrid Gould Ellen & Jens Ludwig, 2015. "Low-Income Housing Policy," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, Volume 2, pages 59-126, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Armin Jeddi Yeganeh & Andrew Patton McCoy & Steve Hankey, 2019. "Green Affordable Housing: Cost-Benefit Analysis for Zoning Incentives," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(22), pages 1-24, November.
    3. Jeremy G. Weber & J. Wesley Burnett & Irene M. Xiarchos, 2016. "Broadening Benefits from Natural Resource Extraction: Housing Values and Taxation of Natural Gas Wells as Property," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(3), pages 587-614, June.
    4. Adam Eckerd & Andrew Keeler, 2012. "Going green together? Brownfield remediation and environmental justice," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 45(4), pages 293-314, December.
    5. Felix Richter, 2014. "Winner Picking in Urban Revitalization Policies: Empirical Evidence from Berlin," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1424, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Di, Wenhua & Murdoch, James C., 2013. "The impact of the low income housing tax credit program on local schools," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 308-320.
    7. Esteban Rossi-Hansberg & Pierre-Daniel Sarte & Raymond Owens, 2010. "Housing Externalities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 118(3), pages 485-535, June.
    8. Kelly D. Edmiston, 2011. "Low-income housing tax credit developments and neighborhood property conditions," Research Working Paper RWP 11-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, revised 2011.
    9. M. Du Preez & M.C. Sale, 2011. "The impact of social housing developments on nearby property prices: A Nelson Mandela Bay Case Study," Working Papers 241, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    10. Raymond E. Owens & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg & Pierre-Daniel G. Sarte, 2008. "Housing externalities : evidence from spatially concentrated urban revitalization programs," Working Paper 08-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, revised 2008.
    11. Ellen, Ingrid Gould, 2020. "What do we know about housing choice vouchers?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C).
    12. Hyunsoo Kim & Youngwoo Kwon & Yeol Choi, 2020. "Assessing the Impact of Public Rental Housing on the Housing Prices in Proximity: Based on the Regional and Local Level of Price Prediction Models Using Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(18), pages 1-25, September.
    13. Olsen, Edgar O. & Zabel, Jeffrey E., 2015. "US Housing Policy," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.),Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 887-986, Elsevier.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:20:y:2001:i:1:p:65-88. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/34787/home .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.