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How automatic adjustment factors affect the internal rate of return of PAYG pension systems

  • KNELL, MARKUS

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Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Journal of Pension Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 9 (2010)
Issue (Month): 01 (January)
Pages: 1-23

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jpenef:v:9:y:2010:i:01:p:1-23_99
Contact details of provider: Postal: Cambridge University Press, UPH, Shaftesbury Road, Cambridge CB2 8BS UK
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  1. Nicholas Barr & Peter Diamond, 2006. "The economics of pensions," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2630, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Andreas Wagener, 2003. "Pensions as a portfolio problem: fixed contribution rates vs. fixed replacement rates reconsidered," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 111-134, 02.
  3. Krueger, Dirk & Kübler, Felix, 2005. "Pareto Improving Social Security Reform when Financial Markets Are Incomplete," CEPR Discussion Papers 5039, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Lindbeck, Assar & Persson, Mats, 2002. "The Gains from Pension Reform," Seminar Papers 712, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  5. Habermann, Christian & Fehr, Hans, 2003. "Pension Reform and Demographic Uncertainty : The Case of Germany," W.E.P. - Würzburg Economic Papers 47, University of Würzburg, Chair for Monetary Policy and International Economics.
  6. Friedrich Breyer & Mathias Kifmann, 2003. "The German Retirement Benefit Formula: Drawbacks and Alternatives," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 326, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  7. Hassler, John & Lindbeck, Assar, 1997. "Intergenerational Risk Sharing, Stability and Optimality of Alternative Pension Systems," Seminar Papers 631, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  8. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2005. "Europe’s Demographic Deficit A Plea For A Child Pension System," De Economist, Springer, vol. 153(1), pages 1-45, December.
  9. ûystein ThÛgersen, 1998. "A note on intergenerational risk sharing and the design of pay-as-you-go pension programs," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 373-378.
  10. Henning Bohn, 1999. "Social Security and Demographic Uncertainty: The Risk Sharing Properties of Alternative Policies," NBER Working Papers 7030, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467.
  12. Wagener, Andreas, 2004. "On intergenerational risk sharing within social security schemes," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 181-206, March.
  13. Robert Fenge & Martin Werding, 2003. "Ageing and Fiscal Imbalances Across Generations: Concepts of Measurement," CESifo Working Paper Series 842, CESifo Group Munich.
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