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How automatic adjustment factors affect the internal rate of return of PAYG pension systems

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  • KNELL, MARKUS

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  • Knell, Markus, 2010. "How automatic adjustment factors affect the internal rate of return of PAYG pension systems," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(01), pages 1-23, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jpenef:v:9:y:2010:i:01:p:1-23_99
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    1. Hassler, J. & Lindbeck, A., 1997. "Intergenerational Risk Sharing, Stability and Optimality of Alternative Pension Systems," Papers 631, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
    2. Wagener, Andreas, 2004. "On intergenerational risk sharing within social security schemes," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, pages 181-206.
    3. ûystein ThÛgersen, 1998. "A note on intergenerational risk sharing and the design of pay-as-you-go pension programs," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 373-378.
    4. Fehr, Hans & Habermann, Christian, 2006. "Pension reform and demographic uncertainty: the case of Germany," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, pages 69-90.
    5. Nicholas Barr & Peter Diamond, 2006. "The Economics of Pensions," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 15-39, Spring.
    6. Assar Lindbeck & Mats Persson, 2003. "The Gains from Pension Reform," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 74-112.
    7. Dirk Krueger & Felix Kubler, 2006. "Pareto-Improving Social Security Reform when Financial Markets are Incomplete!?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 737-755.
    8. Assar Lindbeck & Mats Persson, 2003. "The Gains from Pension Reform," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 74-112.
    9. Robert Fenge & Martin Werding, 2003. "Ageing and Fiscal Imbalances Across Generations: Concepts of Measurement," CESifo Working Paper Series 842, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    11. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2005. "Europe’s Demographic Deficit A Plea For A Child Pension System," De Economist, Springer, pages 1-45.
    12. Friedrich Breyer & Mathias Kifmann, 2004. "The German Retirement Benefit Formula: Drawbacks and Alternatives," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 60(1), pages 1-63, April.
    13. Henning Bohn, 2001. "Social Security and Demographic Uncertainty: The Risk-Sharing Properties of Alternative Policies," NBER Chapters,in: Risk Aspects of Investment-Based Social Security Reform, pages 203-246 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. repec:hhs:iuiwop:493 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Andreas Wagener, 2003. "Pensions as a portfolio problem: fixed contribution rates vs. fixed replacement rates reconsidered," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 111-134.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schröder, Carsten, 2012. "Profitability of pension contributions – evidence from real-life employment biographies," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, pages 311-336.
    2. Markus Knell, 2013. "The Austrian System of Individual Pension Accounts – An Unfinished Symphony," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 4, pages 47-62.
    3. Szüle, Borbála, 2013. "Demográfiai hatások és implicit hozamok kapcsolata a nyugdíjrendszerekben
      [The relationship of demographic effects and implicit returns in pension systems]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(6), pages 703-721.
    4. Metzger, Christoph, 2016. "Intra-household allocation of non-mandatory retirement savings," FZG Discussion Papers 60, University of Freiburg, Research Center for Generational Contracts (FZG).
    5. Godbout, Luc & Trudel, Yves & St-Cerny, Suzie, 2013. "Le régime de rentes du Québec : le rendement différencié selon l’année de prise de la retraite de 1968 jusqu’en 2056," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 89(2), pages 89-113, Juin.
    6. Christl, Michael & Kucsera, Dénes, 2015. "Reformoptionen des österreichischen Pensionssystem und ihre finanziellen Auswirkungen," EconStor Preprints 113283, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    7. Schröder, Carsten, 2012. "Profitability of pension contributions – evidence from real-life employment biographies," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, pages 311-336.
    8. Knell, Markus, 2013. "The Intergenerational Distribution of Demographic Fluctuations in Unfunded and Funded Pension Systems," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79830, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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