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Pension systems, intergenerational risk sharing and inflation

Listed author(s):
  • R. Beetsma
  • A. L. Bovenberg

Everywhere in the industrialized world, population aging is putting social security systems under financial strain. As a result, social security systems are being reformed in many countries. In particular, various countries move from pure pay-as-you-go (PAYG) systems to pension systems that include a larger funded component. At the same time, definedbenefit systems in which benefits are guaranteed by public or corporate sponsors are being replaced by defined-contribution systems in which benefits are subject to various risks.

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File URL: http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/publications/pages/publication636_en.pdf
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Paper provided by Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission in its series European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 with number 257.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2006
Handle: RePEc:euf:ecopap:0257
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  1. Robert J. Shiller, 1998. "Social Security and Institutions for Intergenerational, Intragenerational and International Risk Sharing," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1185, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  2. Modigliani,Franco & Muralidhar,Arun, 2004. "Rethinking Pension Reform," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521834117.
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  7. Oksanen, Heikki, 2006. "Actuarial Neutrality across Generations Applied to Public Pensions under Population Ageing: Effects on Government Finances and National Saving," Discussion Paper 284, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  8. Andreas Wagener, 2001. "On Intergenerational Risk Sharing within Social Security Schemes," CESifo Working Paper Series 499, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Beetsma, Roel M.W.J. & Debrun, Xavier, 2007. "The new stability and growth pact: A first assessment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 453-477, February.
  10. Alan J. Auerbach & Kevin A. Hassett, 2002. "Optimal Long-Run Fiscal Policy: Constraints, Preferences and the Resolution of Uncertainty," NBER Working Papers 9132, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. De Jong, Frank, 2008. "Valuation of pension liabilities in incomplete markets," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 277-294, November.
  12. Felix Kubler & Department of Economics & Department of Economics & Piero Gottardi, 2007. "Social Security and RIsk Sharing," 2007 Meeting Papers 625, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  13. Bohn, Henning, 2009. "Intergenerational risk sharing and fiscal policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 805-816, September.
  14. Assar Lindbeck & Mats Persson, 2003. "The Gains from Pension Reform," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 74-112, March.
  15. Enders, Walter & Lapan, Harvey E., 1982. "Social Security Taxation and Inter-Generational Risk Sharing," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10822, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  16. Constantinides, G.M. & Donalson, J.B. & Mehra, R., 1997. "Junior Can't Borrow: A New Perspective on the Equity Premium Puzzle," Papers 97-24, Columbia - Graduate School of Business.
  17. Roger H. Gordon & Hal R. Varian, 1985. "Intergenerational Risk Sharing," NBER Working Papers 1730, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Torben Andersen, 2005. "Social Security and Longevity," CESifo Working Paper Series 1577, CESifo Group Munich.
  19. ûystein ThÛgersen, 1998. "A note on intergenerational risk sharing and the design of pay-as-you-go pension programs," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 11(3), pages 373-378.
  20. Dirk Krueger & Felix Kubler, 2002. "Intergenerational Risk-Sharing via Social Security when Financial Markets Are Incomplete," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 407-410, May.
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