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Pension systems, intergenerational risk sharing and inflation

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Abstract

Everywhere in the industrialized world, population aging is putting social security systems under financial strain. As a result, social security systems are being reformed in many countries. In particular, various countries move from pure pay-as-you-go (PAYG) systems to pension systems that include a larger funded component. At the same time, definedbenefit systems in which benefits are guaranteed by public or corporate sponsors are being replaced by defined-contribution systems in which benefits are subject to various risks.

Suggested Citation

  • R. Beetsma & A. L. Bovenberg, 2006. "Pension systems, intergenerational risk sharing and inflation," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 257, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  • Handle: RePEc:euf:ecopap:0257
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    Cited by:

    1. Callan, Tim & Keane, Claire & Walsh, John R., 2009. "Pension Policy: New Evidence on Key Issues," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS14, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    (funded) pensions; fiscal policy; nominal assets; risk-sharing; overlapping generations; ; Beetsma; Bovenberg;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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