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Designing Social Security - A Portfolio Choice Approach

  • Matsen, E.
  • Thogersen, O.

Public social security systems may provide diversification of risks to individuals' life-time income. Capturing that a pay-as-you-go program (paygo) may be considered as a "quasi-asset", we study the optimal size of the social security program as well as the optimal split between a funded part and a paygo part by means of a theoretical portfolio choice approach.

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Paper provided by Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration- in its series Papers with number 21/2001.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:norgee:21/2001
Contact details of provider: Postal: NORWEGIAN SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, HELLEVEIEN 30, 5035 BERGEN SANDVIKEN NORWAY.
Phone: 5595 9000
Fax: 5595 9100
Web page: http://www.nhh.no/
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