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The Role of Global Risk Aversion in Explaining Sovereign Spreads

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  • Alicia Garcia-Herrero

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  • Alvaro Ortiz

Abstract

This paper assesses empirically whether global investors´ risk aversion-and its main determinants (U.S. economic growth and the U.S. risk-free rate)-explains developments in Latin American sovereign spreads. We find that global risk aversion is significant and positively related to sovereign spreads in all Latin American countries analyzed. Furthermore, its impact is persistent over time and even increases in most countries. In addition, a rise in the U.S. long-term risk-free rate lowers sovereign spreads in all countries in the short term. However, this optimistic result, given the current juncture in which long-term rates are expected to increase, reverts very rapidly so that sovereign spreads actually rise only some months later.

Suggested Citation

  • Alicia Garcia-Herrero & Alvaro Ortiz, 2006. "The Role of Global Risk Aversion in Explaining Sovereign Spreads," ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, vol. 0(Fall 2006), pages 125-155, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000425:008645
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    Cited by:

    1. Gopalakrishnan, Balagopal & Mohapatra, Sanket, 2017. "Turning Over a Golden Leaf? Global Liquidity and Emerging Market Central Banks’ Demand for Gold after the Financial Crisis," IIMA Working Papers WP 2017-04-02, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
    2. Kevin Cowan & José De Gregorio & Alejandro Micco & Christopher Neilson, 2008. "Financial Diversification, Sudden Stops, and Sudden Starts," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Kevin Cowan & Sebastián Edwards & Rodrigo O. Valdés & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt- (ed.), Current Account and External Financing, edition 1, volume 12, chapter 5, pages 159-194 Central Bank of Chile.
    3. Böninghausen, Benjamin & Zabel, Michael, 2013. "Credit Ratings and Cross-Border Bond Market Spillovers," MPRA Paper 47390, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Akıncı, Özge, 2013. "Global financial conditions, country spreads and macroeconomic fluctuations in emerging countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 358-371.
    5. Ercio Muñoz S., 2013. "Precio de Materias Primas y Spread Soberano en Economías Emergentes ¿Importa la Concentración de las Exportaciones?," Notas de Investigación Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 16(1), pages 100-121, April.
    6. Gopalakrishnan, Balagopal & Mohapatra, Sanket, 2017. "Global Risk and Demand for Gold by Central Banks," IIMA Working Papers WP 2017-01-01, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
    7. Brana, Sophie & Prat, Stéphanie, 2016. "The effects of global excess liquidity on emerging stock market returns: Evidence from a panel threshold model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 26-34.
    8. Edward W. Sun & Daniel Tenengauzer & Ali Bastani & Omid Rezania, 2011. "Identification of Driving Factors for Emerging Markets Sovereign Spreads," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2584-2592.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    global risk aversion; sovereign spreads; Latin America;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects

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