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The effects of economic and political integration on fiscal decentralization: evidence from OECD countries

  • Dan Stegarescu
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    This paper examines the impact of economic and political integration on the vertical government structure. It argues that, by increasing the market size and the benefits of decentralized provision of public goods, integration triggered the recent process of decentralization in OECD countries. A panel analysis relates the degree of fiscal decentralization to economic and European integration, controlling for interregional heterogeneity, economies of scale, and institutions. The results mostly support a decentralizing effect of economic integration in general and of European integration in particular for heterogeneous EU countries, whereas participation of subnational governments in national decision-making is associated with more centralization.

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    File URL: http://economics.ca/cgi/xms?jab=v42n2/CJEv42n2p0694.pdf
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    Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 42 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 694-718

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    Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:42:y:2009:i:2:p:694-718
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