IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Revisiting the Tobin Tax, in the Context of Development and the Financial Crisis

Listed author(s):
  • Yates Nicholas A

    (University of New South Wales)

Registered author(s):

    In the climate of a global financial crisis the problem of financial stability is particularly potent, especially given the difficulties faced around the world in both developed and developing countries. A defence for future crises alongside a means of improving global development problems could possibly be found in the oft-debated Tobin tax. Furthermore, it is shown that the possibilities for global improvement as a result of such a move are too important to be disregarded without proper consideration. As a result of extensive research of the arguments surrounding the tax, it is suggested that the time is ripe for a re-evaluation of Professor Tobin's suggestion.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ldr.2009.2.1/ldr.2009.2.1.1039/ldr.2009.2.1.1039.xml?format=INT
    Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal The Law and Development Review.

    Volume (Year): 2 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 (November)
    Pages: 257-282

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:bpj:lawdev:v:2:y:2009:i:1:n:10
    Contact details of provider: Web page: https://www.degruyter.com

    Order Information: Web: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ldr

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. P. Bernd Spahn, 1995. "International Financial Flows and Transactions Taxes; Survey and Options," IMF Working Papers 95/60, International Monetary Fund.
    2. John Grahl, 2003. "Sand in the wheels or spanner in the works? The Tobin tax and global finance," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(4), pages 597-621, July.
    3. Vaubel, Roland, 2009. "The future of fiscal federalism and the need for global government: A response to Vito Tanzi," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 133-136, March.
    4. Glick, Reuven & Hutchison, Michael, 2005. "Capital controls and exchange rate instability in developing economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 387-412, April.
    5. Kathryn M.E. Dominguez & Linda L. Tesar, 2001. "Exchange Rate Exposure," NBER Working Papers 8453, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. De Long, J Bradford & Andrei Shleifer & Lawrence H. Summers & Robert J. Waldmann, 1990. "Noise Trader Risk in Financial Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(4), pages 703-738, August.
    7. James Tobin, 1978. "A Proposal for International Monetary Reform," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 506, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    8. Cedric Tille, 2003. "The impact of exchange rate movements on U.S. foreign debt," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 9(Jan).
    9. Williams, Jeffrey, 1987. "Futures Markets: A Consequences of Risk Aversion or Transactions Costs?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(5), pages 1000-1023, October.
    10. Mustafa Erdogdu & Hale Balseven, 2006. "How Effective is the Tobin Tax in Coping with Financial Volatility?," Anadolu University Journal of Social Sciences, Anadolu University, vol. 6(1), pages 107-128, June.
    11. Thomas Palley, 2001. "Destabilizing Speculation and the Case for an International Currency Transactions Tax," Challenge, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 44(3), pages 70-89, May.
    12. John M. Griffin & Rene M. Stulz, 1997. "International Competition and Exchange Rate Shocks: A Cross-Country Industry Analysis of Stock Returns," NBER Working Papers 6243, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Christina D. Romer, 1990. "The Great Crash and the Onset of the Great Depression," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(3), pages 597-624.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:lawdev:v:2:y:2009:i:1:n:10. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.