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International Competition and Exchange Rate Shocks: A Cross-Country Industry Analysis of Stock Returns

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  • John M. Griffin
  • Rene M. Stulz

Abstract

It is widely accepted that, for some industries, competition across countries is" economically important and that this competition is strongly affected by exchange rate changes." This paper explores the validity of this view using weekly stock return data on 320 industry pairs" in six countries from 1975 to 1997. It is found that common shocks to industries across countries" are more important than competitive shocks. Weekly exchange rate shocks explain almost" nothing of the relative performance of industries. Using returns measured over longer horizons the importance of exchange rate shocks increases slightly and the importance of common shocks" to industries increases more substantially. Both industry and exchange rate shocks are more" important for industries that produce goods traded internationally, but the importance of these" shocks is economically small for these industries as well.

Suggested Citation

  • John M. Griffin & Rene M. Stulz, 1997. "International Competition and Exchange Rate Shocks: A Cross-Country Industry Analysis of Stock Returns," NBER Working Papers 6243, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6243
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    1. Karolyi, G Andrew & Stulz, Rene M, 1996. " Why Do Markets Move Together? An Investigation of U.S.-Japan Stock Return Comovements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(3), pages 951-986, July.
    2. Hamao, Yasushi & Masulis, Ronald W & Ng, Victor, 1990. "Correlations in Price Changes and Volatility across International Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(2), pages 281-307.
    3. Griffin, John M. & Andrew Karolyi, G., 1998. "Another look at the role of the industrial structure of markets for international diversification strategies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 351-373, December.
    4. Roll, Richard, 1992. " Industrial Structure and the Comparative Behavior of International Stock Market Indices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(1), pages 3-41, March.
    5. Bodnar, Gordon M. & Gentry, William M., 1993. "Exchange rate exposure and industry characteristics: evidence from Canada, Japan, and the USA," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 29-45, February.
    6. Jorion, Philippe, 1990. "The Exchange-Rate Exposure of U.S. Multinationals," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(3), pages 331-345, July.
    7. Geczy, Christopher & Minton, Bernadette A & Schrand, Catherine, 1997. " Why Firms Use Currency Derivatives," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1323-1354, September.
    8. Heston, Steven L. & Rouwenhorst, K. Geert, 1994. "Does industrial structure explain the benefits of international diversification?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 3-27, August.
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