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Behavioral Responses of Patients in AIDS Treatment Programs: Sexual Behavior in Kenya


  • Thirumurthy Harsha

    () (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

  • Pop-Eleches Cristian

    () (Columbia University)

  • Habyarimana James P.

    () (Georgetown University)

  • Goldstein Markus

    () (The World Bank)

  • Graff Zivin Joshua

    () (University of California, San Diego)


We estimate changes in sexual behavior for HIV-positive individuals enrolled in an AIDS treatment program using longitudinal household survey data collected in western Kenya. We find that sexual activity is lowest at the time that treatment is initiated and increases significantly in the subsequent six months, consistent with the health improvements that result from ART treatment. More importantly, we find large and significant increases of 10 to 30 percentage points in the reported use of condoms during last sexual intercourse. The increases in condom use appear to be driven primarily by a program effect, applying to all HIV clinic patients regardless of treatment status.

Suggested Citation

  • Thirumurthy Harsha & Pop-Eleches Cristian & Habyarimana James P. & Goldstein Markus & Graff Zivin Joshua, 2012. "Behavioral Responses of Patients in AIDS Treatment Programs: Sexual Behavior in Kenya," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 1-31, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:fhecpo:v:15:y:2012:i:2:n:1

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. repec:spr:portec:v:1:y:2002:i:2:d:10.1007_s10258-002-0008-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Pascaline Dupas, 2011. "Do Teenagers Respond to HIV Risk Information? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 1-34, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aldashev, Gani & Baland, Jean-Marie, 2012. "Awareness and AIDS: A Political Economy Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 8908, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Baranov, Victoria & Bennett, Daniel & Kohler, Hans-Peter, 2015. "The indirect impact of antiretroviral therapy: Mortality risk, mental health, and HIV-negative labor supply," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 195-211.

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