IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bpj/bistud/v11y2016i1p61-74n6.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Basic Income in the Capitalist Economy: The Mirage of “Exit” from Employment

Author

Listed:
  • Birnbaum Simon

    () (Stockholm University & Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden)

  • De Wispelaere Jurgen

    () (University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland)

Abstract

A widespread argument in the basic income debate is that the unconditional entitlement to a secure income floor improves workers’ bargaining position vis-a-vis their employers. Basic income effectively grants all (potential) workers an exit option from an employment relation that fails to take her interests into account. It gives them the “power to say no”, as argued by Karl Widerquist. Surprisingly, given its importance, the exit argument itself has not been subjected to much systematic analysis by basic income advocates. In this paper we critically examine the exit argument and suggest that, under current economic conditions, an exit strategy might end up worsening rather than strengthening the opportunity set and bargaining position of the most vulnerable workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Birnbaum Simon & De Wispelaere Jurgen, 2016. "Basic Income in the Capitalist Economy: The Mirage of “Exit” from Employment," Basic Income Studies, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 61-74, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bistud:v:11:y:2016:i:1:p:61-74:n:6
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bis.2016.11.issue-1/bis-2016-0013/bis-2016-0013.xml?format=INT
    Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard B. Freeman, 1980. "The Exit-Voice Tradeoff in the Labor Market: Unionism, Job Tenure, Quits, and Separations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(4), pages 643-673.
    2. repec:cup:apsrev:v:105:y:2011:i:04:p:683-701_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Louise Haagh, 2007. "Developmental Freedom and Social Order: Rethinking the Relation between Work and Equality," The Journal of Philosophical Economics, Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies, The Journal of Philosophical Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 119-160, November.
    4. Nancy Folbre, 1995. ""Holding hands at midnight": The paradox of caring labor," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 73-92.
    5. Richard B. Freeman, 1980. "The Exit-Voice Tradeoff in the Labor Market: Unionism, Job Tenure, Quits," NBER Working Papers 0242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Haagh, Louise, 2011. "Working Life, Well-Being and Welfare Reform: Motivation and Institutions Revisited," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 450-473, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:bistud:v:11:y:2016:i:1:p:61-74:n:6. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.degruyter.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.