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The Underestimated Virtues of the Two-sector AK Model

Author

Listed:
  • Felbermayr Gabriel J

    () (University of Tuebingen)

  • Licandro Omar

    () (European University Institute)

Abstract

This paper analyzes some unnoticed predictions of the two-sector AK model in line with the recent literature on embodied technical change. Firstly, by confining constant returns to capital to the investment sector, the AK model generates endogenously the secular downward trend of the relative price of equipment investment and the rising real investment rate observed in US NIPA data. Secondly, Jones' (1995) claim that the AK model fails to reconcile the empirical facts of trending real investment rates and stationary output growth vanishes in the two-sector version. Thirdly, consistent with the evidence from cross-country studies, the model predicts a negative relation between GDP per capita and the relative price of equipment. Hence, in spite of its overly simplistic structure, the two-sector AK model provides important intuition on the implications of a trending relative price of equipment investment in endogenous growth environments.

Suggested Citation

  • Felbermayr Gabriel J & Licandro Omar, 2005. "The Underestimated Virtues of the Two-sector AK Model," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-19, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:contributions.5:y:2005:i:1:n:9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Salvador Barrios & Eric Strobl, "undated". "Industry Mobility and Concentration in the European Union," Working Papers 2002-19, FEDEA.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gabriel J. Felbermayr, 2007. "Specialization on a technologically stagnant sector need not be bad for growth," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, pages 682-701.
    2. Barañano, Ilaski & Romero-Ávila, Diego, 2015. "Long-term growth and persistence with obsolescence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 328-339.
    3. Simón Sosvilla Rivero & Oscar Bajo Rubio & Carmen Díaz Roldán, "undated". "Sobre la efectividad de la política regional comunitaria: El caso de Castilla-la Mancha," Working Papers 2003-25, FEDEA.
    4. Simón Sosvilla Rivero & Oscar Bajo Rubio & Carmen Díaz Roldán, "undated". "Sobre la efectividad de la política regional comunitaria: El caso de Castilla-la Mancha," Working Papers 2003-25, FEDEA.
    5. Ana Balcao Reis & Joao Ejarque, 2005. "(Relative Price) Lessons from Taking an AK Model to the Data," 2005 Meeting Papers 312, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Ejargque, Joao & McKnight, Stephen, 2006. "Can we identify the relative price between consumption and investment?," Economics Discussion Papers 8904, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    7. D'Alessandro, Simone & Salvadori, Neri, 2008. "Pasinetti versus Rebelo: Two different models or just one?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(3-4), pages 547-554, March.
    8. Juan Prieto & Juan Gabriel Rodríguez & Rafael Salas, "undated". "Polarization, Inequality and Tax Reforms," Working Papers 2003-23, FEDEA.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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