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After-School Supervision and Children's Cognitive Achievement


  • Welsch David M.

    () (University of Wisconsin – Whitewater)

  • Zimmer David M.

    () (Western Kentucky University)


This paper estimates the relationship between after-school supervision and cognitive achievement using a nationally-representative sample of children. The topic has important public policy implications due to the large role assumed by the government in providing childcare. The effects of family and nonfamily supervision are considered separately. Estimates suggest that adult supervision, regardless of whether it is provided by a family or nonfamily member, is not directly related to a child's cognitive performance. Instead, children who are likely to receive after-school adult supervision from a family member possess unmeasured personal- or family-specific traits that induce improved cognitive performance. In contrast, children who are likely to receive supervision from nonfamily members possess unmeasured traits that lead to lower cognitive outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Welsch David M. & Zimmer David M., 2008. "After-School Supervision and Children's Cognitive Achievement," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-27, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:8:y:2008:i:1:n:49

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lipscomb, Stephen, 2007. "Secondary school extracurricular involvement and academic achievement: a fixed effects approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 463-472, August.
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    4. Betsey Stevenson, 2010. "Beyond the Classroom: Using Title IX to Measure the Return to High School Sports," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(2), pages 284-301, May.
    5. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2007. "The Production of Cognitive Achievement in Children: Home, School, and Racial Test Score Gaps," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 91-136.
    6. Kathleen Roche & Nan Astone & David Bishai, 2007. "Out-Of-School Care and Youth Problem Behaviors in Low-Income, Urban Areas," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 471-488, September.
    7. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_stature_status_8312006.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Christina Paxson & Norbert Schady, 2007. "Cognitive Development among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health, and Parenting," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
    9. Jonathan Guryan & Erik Hurst & Melissa Kearney, 2008. "Parental Education and Parental Time with Children," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(3), pages 23-46, Summer.
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    11. Kaestner, Robert & Grossman, Michael, 2009. "Effects of weight on children's educational achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 651-661, December.
    12. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2004. "Parental Employment and Child Cognitive Development," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(1).
    13. Ladd, Helen F. & Walsh, Randall P., 2002. "Implementing value-added measures of school effectiveness: getting the incentives right," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1-17, February.
    14. Janet Currie & Duncan Thomas, 1999. "Early Test Scores, Socioeconomic Status and Future Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 6943, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Leon Feinstein, 2003. "Inequality in the Early Cognitive Development of British Children in the 1970 Cohort," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(277), pages 73-97, February.
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    19. repec:pri:indrel:case_paxson_stature_status_8312006 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. repec:pri:indrel:case_paxson_stature_status_8312006.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Avvisati & Marc Gurgand & Nina Guyon & Eric Maurin, 2014. "Getting Parents Involved: A Field Experiment in Deprived Schools," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(1), pages 57-83.

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