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Welfare Reform's Chilling Effects on Noncitizens: Changes in Noncitizen Welfare Recipiency or Shifts in Citizenship Status?

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  • Jennifer Van Hook

Abstract

In the mid-1990s, welfare usage declined disproportionately among noncitizens, prompting some policy analysts to argue that the 1996 Welfare Reform Act (PRWORA) had a "chilling" effect on welfare receipt among eligible non-citizens. However, naturalization among noncitizen welfare recipients could account for the disproportionate decline. This article evaluates the role of naturalizations in producing the so-called chilling effect. Copyright (c) 2003 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

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  • Jennifer Van Hook, 2003. "Welfare Reform's Chilling Effects on Noncitizens: Changes in Noncitizen Welfare Recipiency or Shifts in Citizenship Status?," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 84(3), pages 613-631.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:84:y:2003:i:3:p:613-631
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    1. Borjas, George J., 2004. "Food insecurity and public assistance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1421-1443, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neeraj Kaushal, 2010. "Elderly immigrants' labor supply response to supplemental security income," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(1), pages 137-162.
    2. Stacie Carr & Marta Tienda, 2013. "Family Sponsorship and Late-Age Immigration in Aging America: Revised and Expanded Estimates of Chained Migration," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(6), pages 825-849, December.
    3. Emma Aguila & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2008. "Labor Market and Immigration Behavior of Middle-Aged and Elderly Mexicans," Working Papers wp192, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    4. Emma Aguila & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2010. "Labor Market and Immigration Behavior of Middle-Aged and Elderly Mexicans," Working Papers WR-726, RAND Corporation.

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