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Fertility Cycles, Age Structure and Housing Demand

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  • Bo Malmberg

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  • Bo Malmberg, 2012. "Fertility Cycles, Age Structure and Housing Demand," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 59(5), pages 467-482, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:59:y:2012:i:5:p:467-482
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9485.2012.00590.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Holly, Sean & Jones, Natasha, 1997. "House prices since the 1940s: Cointegration, demography and asymmetries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 549-565, October.
    2. Fair, Ray C & Dominguez, Kathryn M, 1991. "Effects of the Changing U.S. Age Distribution on Macroeconomic Equations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1276-1294, December.
    3. Mankiw, N. Gregory & Weil, David N., 1989. "The baby boom, the baby bust, and the housing market," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 235-258, May.
    4. Simon, Curtis J. & Tamura, Robert, 2009. "Do higher rents discourage fertility? Evidence from U.S. cities, 1940-2000," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 33-42, January.
    5. Hill Kulu & Paul Boyle & Gunnar Andersson, 2009. "High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(31), pages 915-944, December.
    6. Thomas Lindh & Bo Malmberg, 1999. "Age structure effects and growth in the OECD, 1950-1990," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 431-449.
    7. Sato, Yasuhiro, 2007. "Economic geography, fertility and migration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 372-387, March.
    8. Green, Richard & Hendershott, Patric H., 1996. "Age, housing demand, and real house prices," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 465-480, August.
    9. Junjian Yi & Junsen Zhang, 2010. "The Effect Of House Price On Fertility: Evidence From Hong Kong," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(3), pages 635-650, July.
    10. Elod Takats, 2010. "Ageing and asset prices," BIS Working Papers 318, Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Eric Levin & Alberto Montagnoli & Robert E. Wright, 2009. "Demographic Change and the Housing Market: Evidence from a Comparison of Scotland and England," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 46(1), pages 27-43, January.
    12. Ermisch, John, 1996. "The Demand for Housing in Britain and Population Ageing: Microeconometric Evidence," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(251), pages 383-404, August.
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