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Age structure effects and growth in the OECD, 1950-1990


  • Thomas Lindh

    () (Institute for Housing Research, Uppsala University, Box 785, SE-801 29 GÄvle, Sweden)

  • Bo Malmberg

    () (Institute for Housing Research, Uppsala University, Box 785, SE-801 29 GÄvle, Sweden)


Economic growth depends on human resources and human needs. The demographic age structure shapes both of these factors. We study five-year data from the OECD countries 1950-1990 in the framework of an age structure augmented neoclassical growth model with gradual technical adjustment. The model performs well in both pooled and panel estimations. The growth patterns of GDP per worker (labor productivity) in the OECD countries are to a large extent explained by age structure changes. The 50-64 age group has a positive influence, and the group above 65 contributes negatively, while younger age groups have ambiguous effects. However, the mechanism behind these age effects is not yet resolved.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Lindh & Bo Malmberg, 1999. "Age structure effects and growth in the OECD, 1950-1990," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 431-449.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:12:y:1999:i:3:p:431-449
    Note: Received: 16 January 1997/Accepted: 2 July 1998

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Growth · age structure · technology barriers · human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries


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