IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Industrial Policy In Great Britain And Its Effect On Total Factor Productivity In Manufacturing Plants, 1990-1998


  • Richard Harris
  • Catherine Robinson


Industrial policy in any economy has a number of varying and occasionally conflicting objectives, but the overarching intention of the various grants, subsidies and support schemes, arguably, must be to improve the economic performance of the plants they assist directly. However, in the absence of counterfactual evidence, whether or not assistance does improve performance is hard to establish. In this paper, we consider the impact of two UK government industrial support schemes (Regional Selective Assistance and the Small Firm Merit Awards for Research and Technology) on UK manufacturing plant level total factor productivity in an attempt to answer the question, 'did assistance make a difference?' Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Harris & Catherine Robinson, 2004. "Industrial Policy In Great Britain And Its Effect On Total Factor Productivity In Manufacturing Plants, 1990-1998," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(4), pages 528-543, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:51:y:2004:i:4:p:528-543

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 624-660, June.
    2. Schmitt-Grohe, Stephanie & Uribe, Martin, 2003. "Closing small open economy models," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 163-185, October.
    3. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 1996. "Foundations of International Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262150476, July.
    4. Bayoumi, Tamim & Sarno, Lucio & Taylor, Mark P, 1999. "European Capital Flows and Regional Risk," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 67(1), pages 21-38, January.
    5. Sutherland, Alan, 1996. " Financial Market Integration and Macroeconomic Volatility," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(4), pages 521-539, December.
    6. Benigno, Pierpaolo, 2004. "Optimal monetary policy in a currency area," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 293-320, July.
    7. Lombardo, Giovanni, 2002. "Imperfect Competition, Monetary Policy and Welfare in a Currency Area," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2002,21, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    8. Centeno, Mario & Mello, Antonio S., 1999. "How integrated are the money market and the bank loans market within the European Union?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 75-106, January.
    9. Tille, Cedric, 2001. "The role of consumption substitutability in the international transmission of monetary shocks," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 421-444, April.
    10. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Chia-Hui Huang, 2015. "Tax credits and total factor productivity: firm-level evidence from Taiwan," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(6), pages 932-947, December.
    2. Kolesnikova Irina, 2010. "State Aid for Industrial Enterprises in Belarus: Remedy or Poison?," EERC Working Paper Series 10/01e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    3. Sourafel Girma & Holger Görg & Aoife Hanley & Eric Strobl, 2010. "The effect of grant receipt on start-up size: Evidence from plant level data," Journal of International Entrepreneurship, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 371-391, December.
    4. Bernini, Cristina & Cerqua, Augusto & Pellegrini, Guido, 2017. "Public subsidies, TFP and efficiency: A tale of complex relationships," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 751-767.
    5. Nicholas Crafts & Alan Hughes, 2013. "Industrial Policy for the Medium to Long-term," Working Papers wp455, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    6. Crafts, Nicholas, 2012. "Creating Competitive Advantage: Policy Lessons from History," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 91, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    7. Andries Brandsma & d'Artis Kancs & Pavel Ciaian, 2013. "The Role of Additionality in the EU Cohesion Policies: An Example of Firm-Level Investment Support," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(6), pages 838-853, June.
    8. Ankarhem, Mattias & Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov & Quoreshi, Shahiduzzaman & Rudholm, Niklas, 2009. "Do Regional Investment Grants Improve Firm Performance? Evidence from Sweden," Ratio Working Papers 137, The Ratio Institute.
    9. Richard Harris & John Moffat, 2011. "Plant-level Determinants of Total Factor Productivity in Great Britain, 1997-2006," SERC Discussion Papers 0064, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    10. Harris, Richard, 2009. "Spillover and backward linkage effects of FDI: empirical evidence for the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33206, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:51:y:2004:i:4:p:528-543. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.