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The Estimation Of Pensioner Equivalence Scales Using Subjective Data


  • Mark B. Stewart


This paper uses panel data on pensioners' subjective evaluations of their financial positions to construct equivalence scales for pensioners. A pensioner couple is estimated to require an income 44 percent higher than a comparable single pensioner to reach the same standard of living. This is significantly less than the equivalence scale value implied by the ratio of state pension rates, the McClements equivalence scale value, and the scale value derived from Engel curve estimation for food expenditure using the same data source. The estimated equivalence scale value is robust to variations in the definition of the pensioner sample, the measurement of income, and the econometric model used. Copyright 2009 The Author. Journal compilation International Association for Research in Income and Wealth 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark B. Stewart, 2009. "The Estimation Of Pensioner Equivalence Scales Using Subjective Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(4), pages 907-929, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:55:y:2009:i:4:p:907-929

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    Cited by:

    1. Aline Bütikofer & Michael Gerfin, 2017. "The economies of scale of living together and how they are shared: estimates based on a collective household model," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 433-453, June.
    2. Morciano, Marcello & Hancock, Ruth & Pudney, Stephen, 2012. "Disability costs and equivalence scales in the older population," ISER Working Paper Series 2012-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Oznur Ozdamar & Eleftherios Giovanis, 2016. "The Link between Health Condition Costs and Standard of Living: A Structural Equation Modelling," Working Papers 1060, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 Jan 2016.
    4. repec:kap:jecinq:v:15:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10888-017-9354-x is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Justin Ven & Nicolas Hérault & Francisco Azpitarte, 2017. "Identifying tax implicit equivalence scales," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 15(3), pages 257-275, September.
    6. John Bishop & Andrew Grodner & Haiyong Liu & Ismael Ahamdanech-Zarco, 2014. "Subjective poverty equivalence scales for Euro Zone countries," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(2), pages 265-278, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General


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