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Equivalence Scales in an Intertemporal Setting with an Application to the Former West Germany

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  • Charlier, Erwin

Abstract

Equivalence scales provide answers to questions like how much a household with two children needs to spend compared to a couple to attain the same welfare level. These are important questions for child allowances, social benefits and to assess the cost of children over the life-cycle for example. We discuss equivalence scales in an intertemporal setting with uncertainty. To estimate equivalence scales we use a panel from German households (GSOEP) containing subjective data on satisfaction with life and satisfaction with income to represent the welfare level. Because satisfaction is measured on a discrete scale we use limited dependent variable models for panel data in estimation. Using satisfaction with life data we find that larger households do not need any additional income to be as satisfied as a couple. Using satisfaction with income, however, yields equivalence scales that increase with household size. Copyright 2002 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Charlier, Erwin, 2002. "Equivalence Scales in an Intertemporal Setting with an Application to the Former West Germany," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(1), pages 99-126, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:48:y:2002:i:1:p:99-126
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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Dudel & Notburga Ott & Martin Werding, 2016. "Maintaining one’s living standard at old age: What does that mean?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(3), pages 1261-1279, November.
    2. Christian Dudel & Notburga Ott & Martin Werding, 2013. "Maintaining One's Living Standard at Old Age: What Does that Mean? Evidence Using Panel Data from Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 4223, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Masako Oyama, 2006. "Measuring cost of children using equivalence scale on Japanese panel data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(7), pages 409-415.
    4. Charles Bellemare & Bertrand Melenberg & Arthur van Soest van Soest, 2002. "Semi-parametric models for satisfaction with income," CeMMAP working papers CWP12/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Ahlheim, Michael & Schneider, Friedrich, 2013. "Considering household size in contingent valuation studies," MPRA Paper 62898, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Aline Bütikofer & Michael Gerfin, 2017. "The economies of scale of living together and how they are shared: estimates based on a collective household model," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 433-453, June.
    7. Jean-Marc Falter, 2006. "Equivalence Scales and Subjective Data in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(II), pages 263-284, June.
    8. Betti Gianni & Karadag Mehmet Ali & Sarica Ozlem & Ucar Baris, 2017. "Regional differences in equivalence scales in Turkey," Экономика региона, CyberLeninka;Федеральное государственное бюджетное учреждение науки «Институт экономики Уральского отделения Российской академии наук», vol. 13(1), pages 63-69.
    9. Knabe, Andreas & Borah, Melanie & Kuhställer, Carina, 2016. "Reference Income Effects in the Determination of Equivalence Scales Using Income Satisfaction Data," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145545, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Mark B. Stewart, 2009. "The Estimation Of Pensioner Equivalence Scales Using Subjective Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(4), pages 907-929, December.
    11. Christopher R. Bollinger & Cheti Nicoletti & Stephen Pudney, 2012. "Two can live as cheaply as one... But three's a crowd," Discussion Papers 12/23, Department of Economics, University of York.
    12. Jürgen Faik, 2013. "Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Equivalence Scales for West Germany Based on Subjective Data on Life Satisfaction," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 575, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    13. repec:spr:qualqt:v:51:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11135-016-0325-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:5:p:875-905 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Michael Ahlheim & Ulrike Lehr, 2008. "Equity and Aggregation in Environmental Valuation," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 295/2008, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.

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