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Exchange-rate Effects on China's Trade

Author

Listed:
  • Jaime Marquez
  • John Schindler

Abstract

Though China's share of world trade exceeds that of Japan, little is known about the response of China's trade to changes in exchange rates. The few estimates available have two limitations. First, the data for trade prices are based on proxies for prices from other countries. Secondly, the estimation sample includes the period of China's transformation from a centrally-planned economy to a more market-oriented one. We address these limitations with an empirical model explaining the shares of China's exports and imports in world trade in terms of the real effective value of the renminbi. The specifications control for foreign direct investment and for the role of imports of parts to assemble exports. Parameter estimation uses disaggregated monthly trade data and excludes China's decentralization period. We find that a 10 percent real appreciation of the renminbi lowers the share of aggregate Chinese exports by nearly one percentage point. However, the estimated response of imports is negligible and lacks precision. Copyright © 2007 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaime Marquez & John Schindler, 2007. "Exchange-rate Effects on China's Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(5), pages 837-853, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:15:y:2007:i:5:p:837-853
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anuradha Dayal-Gulati & Valerie Cerra, 1999. "China's Trade Flows; Changing Price Sensitivies and the Reform Process," IMF Working Papers 99/1, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Guillaume Gaulier & Françoise Lemoine & Deniz Ünal-Kesenci, 2005. "China’s Integration in East Asia: Production Sharing, FDI & High-Tech Trade," Working Papers 2005-09, CEPII research center.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Chinn, Menzie D. & Qian, XingWang, 2012. "Are Chinese trade flows different?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(8), pages 2127-2146.
    2. Kappler, Marcus & Reisen, Helmut & Schularick, Moritz & Turkisch, Edouard, 2013. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Large Exchange Rate Appreciations," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 471-494.
    3. repec:hal:cesptp:halshs-00960664 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Joong Shik Kang & Wei Liao, 2016. "Chinese Imports; What’s Behind the Slowdown?," IMF Working Papers 16/106, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Willem Thorbecke, 2010. "How Would an Appreciation of the Yuan Affect the People's Republic of China's Surplus in Processing Trade?," Working Papers id:2621, eSocialSciences.
    6. Gozgor, Giray, 2014. "Aggregated and disaggregated import demand in China: An empirical study," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 1-8.
    7. Pami Dua & Divya Tuteja, 2015. "Global Recession and Eurozone Debt Crisis: Impact on Exports of China and India," Working Papers id:7386, eSocialSciences.
    8. Yin-Wong Cheung & Menzie D. Chinn & Eiji Fujii, 2010. "China's Current Account and Exchange Rate," NBER Chapters,in: China's Growing Role in World Trade, pages 231-271 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Yin-Wong Cheung & Menzie D. Chinn & Xingwang Qian, 2014. "The Structural Behavior of China-US Trade Flows," CESifo Working Paper Series 5123, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Cao Emily Yixuan & Cao Yong & Prasad Rashmi & Shen Zhengping, 2011. "U.S.-China Exchange Rate Negotiation: Stakeholders' Participation and Strategy Deployment," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(3), pages 1-25, October.
    11. Soyoung Kim & Yoonbai Kim, 2016. "The RMB Debate: Empirical Analysis on the Effects of Exchange Rate Shocks in China and Japan," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(10), pages 1539-1557, October.
    12. Thorbecke, Willem, 2015. "China–US trade: A global outlier," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 47-58.
    13. Willem Thorbecke & Hanjiang Zhang, 2009. "The Effect Of Exchange Rate Changes On China'S Labour-Intensive Manufacturing Exports," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(3), pages 398-409, August.
    14. repec:eee:reveco:v:54:y:2018:i:c:p:27-43 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Yin-Wong Cheung & Menzie Chinn & Xingwang Qian, 2016. "China–US trade flow behavior: the implications of alternative exchange rate measures and trade classifications," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(1), pages 43-67, February.
    16. Kumakura, Masanaga & Kuroko, Masato, 2007. "China's Impact on the Exports of Other Asian Countries: A Note," IDE Discussion Papers 131, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    17. Bems, Rudolfs, 2014. "Intermediate inputs, external rebalancing and relative price adjustment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 248-262.
    18. Bhattarai, Keshab & Mallick, Sushanta, 2013. "Impact of China's currency valuation and labour cost on the US in a trade and exchange rate model," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 40-59.
    19. Hooy, Chee-Wooi & Siong-Hook, Law & Tze-Haw, Chan, 2015. "The impact of the Renminbi real exchange rate on ASEAN disaggregated exports to China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 253-259.
    20. Eichengreen, Barry & Tong, Hui, 2015. "Effects of renminbi appreciation on foreign firms: The role of processing exports," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 146-157.
    21. Yu, Miaojie, 2009. "Revaluation of the Chinese Yuan and triad trade: A gravity assessment," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 655-668, November.
    22. Shaghil Ahmed, 2009. "Are Chinese exports sensitive to changes in the exchange rate?," International Finance Discussion Papers 987, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    23. Li, Hongbin & Ma, Hong & Xu, Yuan, 2015. "How do exchange rate movements affect Chinese exports? — A firm-level investigation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(1), pages 148-161.

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