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Trade, Human Capital, and Technology Spillovers: an Industry-level Analysis

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  • Yanling Wang

Abstract

This paper studies whether trade promotes North-South and South-South technology spillovers at the industry level, and how the absorptive capacity of the South affects the impact of the technology spillovers. Using data from 16 manufacturing industries in 25 developing countries from 1976 to 1998, the paper shows: (i) North-South trade-related R&D has a substantial impact on total factor productivity in the South; (ii) South-South trade-related R&D also promotes technology spillovers but with a smaller magnitude; and (iii) human capital is very important in facilitating North-South and South-South technology spillovers: an increase in human capital could lead to over three times the size of technology spillovers from an increase in trade-related foreign R&D. Copyright © 2007 The Author; Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Yanling Wang, 2007. "Trade, Human Capital, and Technology Spillovers: an Industry-level Analysis," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 269-283, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:15:y:2007:i:2:p:269-283
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-563, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nadia Belhaj Hassine & Veronique Robichaud & Bernard Decaluwé, 2010. "Agricultural Trade Liberalization, Productivity Gain and Poverty Alleviation: A General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers 519, Economic Research Forum, revised 05 Jan 2010.
    2. Neil Foster-McGregor & Johannes Pöschl, 2016. "Productivity effects of knowledge transfers through labour mobility," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 169-184, December.
    3. Letizia Montinari & Michael Rochlitz, 2012. "Absorptive Capacity and Efficiency: A Comparative Stochastic Frontier Approach Using Sectoral Data," Working Papers 4/2012, IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca, revised Jun 2012.
    4. Colantonio Emiliano & D'Angelo Francesca & Odoardi Iacopo & Scamuffa Domenico, 2010. "Internationalization And Innovation: The Challenges For Europe In A Changing World," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 214-219, December.
    5. Richard Perkins & Eric Neumayer, 2009. "How do domestic attributes affect international spillovers of CO2-efficiency?," GRI Working Papers 8, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    6. repec:ial:wpaper:4 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Das, Gouranga Gopal, 2015. "Why some countries are slow in acquiring new technologies? A model of trade-led diffusion and absorption," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 65-91.
    8. Richard Perkins & Eric Neumayer, 2012. "Do recipient country characteristics affect international spillovers of CO 2 -efficiency via trade and foreign direct investment?," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(2), pages 469-491, May.
    9. Nadia Belhaj Hassine & Veronique Robichaud & Bernard Decaluwé, 2010. "Does Agricultural Trade Liberalization Help The Poor in Tunisia? A Micro-Macro View in A Dynamic General Equilibrium Context," Working Papers 556, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 Jan 2010.
    10. Schiff, Maurice & Wang, Yanling, 2017. "North-South Trade, Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth: Are Small States Different?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 79, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    11. repec:bla:worlde:v:39:y:2016:i:12:p:2025-2045 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Johannes Pöschl & Neil Foster-McGregor & Robert Stehrer, 2016. "International R&D Spillovers and Business Service Innovation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(12), pages 2025-2045, December.

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