IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/glodps/79.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

North-South Trade, Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth: Are Small States Different?

Author

Listed:
  • Schiff, Maurice
  • Wang, Yanling

Abstract

The economies of small developing states tend to be more fragile than those in large ones. This paper examines this issue in a dynamic context by focusing on the impact of education and North-South trade-related technology diffusion (NRD) on TFP growth in small and large states in the South. The main findings are: i) TFP growth increases with NRD, education and the interaction between the two; ii) the impact of NRD, education and their interaction on TFP growth in small states is over three times that for large countries; and iii) the greater TFP growth loss in small states has two brain drain-related causes: a substantially greater sensitivity of TFP growth to the brain drain, and brain drain levels that are much higher in small than in large states.

Suggested Citation

  • Schiff, Maurice & Wang, Yanling, 2017. "North-South Trade, Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth: Are Small States Different?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 79, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:79
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/162048/1/GLO_DP_0079.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Yanling Wang, 2007. "Trade, Human Capital, and Technology Spillovers: an Industry-level Analysis," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 269-283, May.
    3. Michel Beine & Fréderic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2008. "Brain Drain and Human Capital Formation in Developing Countries: Winners and Losers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 631-652, April.
    4. Docquier, Frédéric & Schiff, Maurice, 2008. "Measuring Skilled Emigration Rates: The Case of Small States," IZA Discussion Papers 3388, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Maurice Schiff & Yanling Wang, 2006. "North-South and South-South trade-related technology diffusion: an industry-level analysis of direct and indirect effects," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(3), pages 831-844, August.
    6. Eaton, Jonathan & Kortum, Samuel, 1999. "International Technology Diffusion: Theory and Measurement," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 537-570, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technology Diffusion; Trade; Productivity Growth; Education;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:79. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/glaboea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.