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Macroeconomic Effects of Capital Account Liberalization: the Case of Korea


  • Soyoung Kim
  • Sunghyun Henry Kim
  • Yunjong Wang


The macroeconomic effects of capital account liberalization in Korea are examined. Simple data analysis suggests that capital account liberalization substantially changed the nature and composition of capital flows. Based on the VAR model, the authors find the following stylized facts. First, after capital market liberalization, capital flows become less driven by current account imbalances and therefore become more autonomous. Second, capital account liberalization significantly changes the effects of capital flows on macroeconomic variables. Third, capital account liberalization is highly related to consumption and investment booms, and subsequent appreciation of nominal and real exchange rates, which leads to the current account worsening. Finally, there is strong evidence of sterilized foreign exchange market intervention in response to capital inflows. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2004..

Suggested Citation

  • Soyoung Kim & Sunghyun Henry Kim & Yunjong Wang, 2004. "Macroeconomic Effects of Capital Account Liberalization: the Case of Korea," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 624-639, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:8:y:2004:i:4:p:624-639

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Vittorio Grilli & Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, 1995. "Economic Effects and Structural Determinants of Capital Controls," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(3), pages 517-551, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:openec:v:29:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11079-017-9472-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Tomer Shachmurove & Yochanan Shachmurove, 2007. "In the Same Boat: Exchange Rate Interdependence in the Asia-Pacific Region," PIER Working Paper Archive 07-019, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    3. Müller-Plantenberg, Nikolas A., 2010. "Balance of payments accounting and exchange rate dynamics," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 46-63, January.
    4. Kim, Soyoung & Yang, Doo Yong, 2008. "The Impact of Capital Inflows on Emerging East Asian Economies: Is Too Much Money Chasing Too Little Good?," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 15, Asian Development Bank.
    5. Soyoung Kim & Doo Yang, 2011. "The Impact of Capital Inflows on Asset Prices in Emerging Asian Economies: Is Too Much Money Chasing Too Little Good?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 293-315, April.
    6. Soyoung Kim & Doo Yong Yang, 2010. "Managing Capital Flows: The Case of the Republic of Korea," Chapters,in: Managing Capital Flows, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Bilge Bakin & Gozde Gurgun, 2014. "Portfolio Investments and Asset Prices Relationship in Turkey," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 0201138, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.

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