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Housing In A Neoclassical Growth Model


  • Lichao Cheng
  • Bin Li
  • Zhixiong Zeng


We present evidence that in the USA, the relative price of housing exhibits secular growth and that its growth rate is a stationary series. The ratio of the value of house stock to either consumption or GDP is also stationary. We develop a two-sector neoclassical growth model with housing that is consistent with these facts. Among the long-run determinants of the growth of housing prices and housing stock per capita are factor intensities, rates of technological progress in both the housing and non-housing sectors, and the excess of population growth over land growth. We also study the model's transitional dynamics. Copyright 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Lichao Cheng & Bin Li & Zhixiong Zeng, 2010. "Housing In A Neoclassical Growth Model," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 246-262, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:pacecr:v:15:y:2010:i:2:p:246-262

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Eswar Prasad & Shang-Jin Wei, 2007. "The Chinese Approach to Capital Inflows: Patterns and Possible Explanations," NBER Chapters,in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences, pages 421-480 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kuang-Liang Chang & Nan-Kuang Chen & Charles Ka Yui Leung, 2013. "In the Shadow of the U nited S tates: The International Transmission Effect of Asset Returns," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 1-40, February.
    2. Chakravarty, Sugato & Pylypiv, Mariya I., 2015. "The Role of Subsidization and Organizational Status on Microfinance Borrower Repayment Rates," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 737-748.

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