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Endogenous Growth: Estimating the Romer Model for the US and Germany

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  • Gang Gong
  • Alfred Greiner
  • Willi Semmler

Abstract

By contrasting endogenous growth models with facts, one is frequently confronted with the prediction that levels of economic variables, such as R&D expenditures, imply lasting effects on the growth rate of an economy. As stylized facts show, the research intensity in most advanced countries has dramatically increased, mostly more than the GDP. Yet, the growth rates have roughly remained constant or even declined. In this paper we modify the Romer endogenous growth model and test our variant of the model using time series data. We estimate the market version both for the US and Germany for the time period January 1962 to April 1996. Our results demonstrate that the model is compatible with the time series for aggregate data in those countries. All parameters fall into a reasonable range. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Gang Gong & Alfred Greiner & Willi Semmler, 2004. "Endogenous Growth: Estimating the Romer Model for the US and Germany," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(2), pages 147-164, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:66:y:2004:i:2:p:147-164
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    Cited by:

    1. Kong Weng Ho & Hian Teck Hoon, 2006. "Growth Accounting for a Follower-Economy in a World of Ideas : The Example of Singapore," Development Economics Working Papers 22435, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Ho, Kong Weng & Hoon, Hian Teck, 2009. "Growth accounting for a technology follower in a world of ideas: The case of Singapore," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 156-173, March.
    3. Hulya Ulku, 2007. "R&D, innovation, and growth: evidence from four manufacturing sectors in OECD countries," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(3), pages 513-535, July.
    4. Tom-Reiel Heggedal, 2008. "On R&D and the undersupply of emerging versus mature technologies," Discussion Papers 571, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Creina Day, 2016. "Non-Scale Endogenous Growth with R&D and Human Capital," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 63(5), pages 443-467, November.
    6. Bettina Büttner, 2006. "Effectiveness versus Efficiency: Growth-Accelerating Policies in a Model of Growth without Scale Effects," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7, pages 297-316, August.
    7. Rao, B. Bhaskara & Singh, Rup & Nisha, Fozia, 2006. "An extension to the neoclassical growth modelto Estimate Growth and Level Effects," MPRA Paper 2186, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Bayraktar-Sağlam, Bahar & Yetkiner, Hakan, 2014. "A Romerian contribution to the empirics of economic growth," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 257-272.
    9. Bye, Brita & Fæhn, Taran & Heggedal, Tom-Reiel, 2009. "Welfare and growth impacts of innovation policies in a small, open economy; an applied general equilibrium analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 1075-1088, September.
    10. Edwin Garces & Tugrul Daim, 2012. "Impact of Renewable Energy Technology on the Economic Growth of the USA," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 3(3), pages 233-249, September.

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