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Primary Education as an Input into Post-primary Education: A Neglected Benefit

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  • Appleton, Simon
  • Hoddinott, John
  • Knight, John

Abstract

In some developing countries, private rates of return to primary education have fallen to low levels. An explanation is provided as to why this fall need not reduce the demand for primary education. Primary schooling is a necessary input into postprimary. In an educational system that is demand-constrained at the postprimary level, the 'prospect' of postprimary schooling raises the primary return above the rate as conventionally measured. An application of the model to two countries--Cote d'Ivoire and Uganda--doubles the primary rate of return in each case. Copyright 1996 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Appleton, Simon & Hoddinott, John & Knight, John, 1996. "Primary Education as an Input into Post-primary Education: A Neglected Benefit," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(1), pages 211-219, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:58:y:1996:i:1:p:211-19
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    Cited by:

    1. David SAHN & Peter GLICK & Thomas F. WALKER, 2012. "Household Shocks and Education Investment in Madagascar," Working Papers 201227, CERDI.
    2. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon & Jeemol Unni, 2001. "Education and Women's Labour Market Outcomes in India," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 173-195.
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4457 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gimenez, G. & Sanau, J., 2009. "Investment, Human Capital and Institutions: A Multi-equational Approach for the Study of Economic Growth, 1985-2000," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(1).
    5. Gregorio Jiménez & Jaime Sanaú, 2007. "The Desirability of Multi-equational Approaches for the Study of Economic Growth. An Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 02/07, Instituto Universitario de Análisis Económico y Social.
    6. Barakat, Bilal & Crespo Cuaresma, Jesus, 2016. "Credit Where Credit Is Due: An Approach to Education Returns Based on Shapley Values," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 5086, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    7. Simon Appleton, 2000. "Education and Health at the Household Level in Sub-Saharan Africa," CID Working Papers 33A, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    8. Peter J. Glick & David E. Sahn & Thomas F. Walker, 2016. "Household Shocks and Education Investments in Madagascar," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(6), pages 792-813, December.
    9. Appleton, Simon, 1996. "Women-headed households and household welfare: An empirical deconstruction for Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(12), pages 1811-1827, December.
    10. Puja Vasudeva Dutta, 2006. "Returns to Education: New Evidence for India, 1983-1999," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 431-451.
    11. Peter Glick & François Roubaud, 2004. "Export Processing Zone Expansion in an African Country: What are the Labor Market and Gender Impacts?," Working Papers DT/2004/15, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation), revised Dec 2004.
    12. Alan de Brauw & John Giles, 2017. "Migrant Opportunity and the Educational Attainment of Youth in Rural China," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 52(1), pages 272-311.
    13. Simon Appleton & Arsene Balihuta, 1996. "Education and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Uganda," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 415-444.
    14. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, 1998. "Does the labour market explain lower female schooling in India?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 39-65.
    15. Jan Willem Gunning & Paul Collier, 1999. "Explaining African Economic Performance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 64-111, March.
    16. Handa, Sudhanshu, 1999. "Raising primary school enrollment in developing countries," FCND discussion papers 76, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    17. Marito Garcia & Jean Fares, 2008. "Youth in Africa's Labor Market," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6578.
    18. Gautam Hazarika, 2001. "The Sensitivity of Primary School Enrollment to the Costs of Post-Primary Schooling in Rural Pakistan: A Gender Perspective," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 237-244.
    19. Puja Vasudeva Dutta, 2004. "The Structure of Wages in India, 1983-1999," PRUS Working Papers 25, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.
    20. Collier, Paul & Guillaumont, Patrick & Guillaumont, Sylviane & Gunning, Jan Willem, 1997. "Redesigning conditionality," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(9), pages 1399-1407, September.
    21. Ding, Weili & Zhang, Yuan, 2014. "When a son is born: The impact of fertility patterns on family finance in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 192-208.
    22. Simon Appleton & John Hoddinott & John MacKinnon, 1996. "Education and health in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 307-339.

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