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Upstream Transfers And The Donor'S Labour Supply: Evidence From Migrants Living In France

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  • FRANÇOIS-CHARLES WOLFF
  • RALITZA DIMOVA

Abstract

With the use of data on migrants living in France, we study the pattern of transfers of time and money made to parents. Monetary transfers allocate predominantly towards the large number of elderly parents in the country of origin, while the smaller number of migrant parents in France are more likely to receive time transfers. Our econometric results suggest that monetary transfers are more consistent with the altruistic hypothesis. Furthermore, while the donor's labour participation increases the propensity to give money, there is no negative relationship between time transfers and the labour participation of the donor. Copyright © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The University of Manchester.

Suggested Citation

  • François-Charles Wolff & Ralitza Dimova, 2009. "Upstream Transfers And The Donor'S Labour Supply: Evidence From Migrants Living In France," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 77(2), pages 204-224, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:77:y:2009:i:2:p:204-224
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    1. François-Charles Wolff & Ralitza Dimova, 2006. "How Do Migrants Care for Their Elderly Parents? Time, Money and Location," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(V), pages 123-130.
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    8. Altonji, Joseph G & Hayashi, Fumio & Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1997. "Parental Altruism and Inter Vivos Transfers: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(6), pages 1121-1166, December.
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    17. William Greene, 1998. "Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges: Comment," Working Papers 98-06, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
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