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Habit formation, work ethics and technological progress

Author

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  • Joao Ricardo Faria
  • Miguel A. Leon-Ledesma

Abstract

Work ethics affect labour supply. This idea is modelled assuming that work is habit forming. We introduce working habits in a neoclassical growth model and compare its outcomes with a model without habit formation. In addition, we analyse the impact of different forms of technical progress. The findings are that (i) labour supply in the habit formation case is higher than in the neoclassical case; (ii) unlike in the neoclassical case, labour supply in the presence of habit formation depends on the kind of technical progress; and (iii) the kind of technical progress will hence affect the steady-state levels of consumption, capital stock and output. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester, 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Joao Ricardo Faria & Miguel A. Leon-Ledesma, 2004. "Habit formation, work ethics and technological progress," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 72(3), pages 403-413, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:72:y:2004:i:3:p:403-413
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ali Choudhary & Paul Levine, 2006. "The 24/7 Society and Multiple Habits," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0506, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    2. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00344793 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dan Wheatley & Irene Hardill & Bruce Philp, 2008. "Managing reductions in working hours: a study of work-time and leisure preferences in UK industry," Working Papers 2008/5, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
    4. Vladimir Kühl Teles & Joaquim P. Andrade, 2005. "Crime And Punishment With Habit Formation," Anais do XXXIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 33rd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 090, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    5. Paul Levine & Peter McAdam & Peter Welz, 2013. "On Habit and the Socially Efficient Level of Consumption and Work Effort," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0713, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    6. Forson, Joseph Ato & Janrattanagul, Jakkaphong & Carsamer, Emmanuel Carsamer, 2013. "Culture Matters: A Test of Rationality on Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 56825, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Bonatti, Luigi, 2008. "Evolution of preferences and cross-country differences in time devoted to market work," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1341-1365, December.
    8. João Ricardo Faria & Gonçalo Monteiro, "undated". "The Tenure Game: Building Up Academic Habits," Discussion Papers 05/32, Department of Economics, University of York.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D99 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Other
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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