IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cup/jechis/v57y1997i02p267-287_01.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Is it Kosher to Talk about Culture?

Author

Listed:
  • Temin, Peter

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Temin, Peter, 1997. "Is it Kosher to Talk about Culture?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(02), pages 267-287, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:57:y:1997:i:02:p:267-287_01
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022050700018441
    File Function: link to article abstract page
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter Temin, 1971. "The Beginning of the Depression in Germany," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 24(2), pages 240-248, May.
    2. Eichengreen, Barry, 1984. "Central bank cooperation under the interwar gold standard," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 64-87, January.
    3. Eichengreen, Barry J., 1981. "A dynamic model of tariffs, output and employment under flexible exchange rates," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 341-359, August.
    4. Peden, G C, 1980. "Keynes, the Treasury and Unemployment in the Later Nineteen-Thirties," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(1), pages 1-18, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Iyigun, Murat, 2007. "Monotheism (From a Sociopolitical and Economic Perspective)," IZA Discussion Papers 3116, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Alberto E. Chong, 2006. "Does It Matter How People Speak?," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1946, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Iyigun, Murat, 2006. "Ottoman Conquests and European Ecclesiastical Pluralism," IZA Discussion Papers 1973, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Botticini, Maristella & Eckstein, Zvi, 2005. "Jewish Occupational Selection: Education, Restrictions, or Minorities?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(04), pages 922-948, December.
    5. James B. Ang, 2015. "Agricultural Legacy, Individualistic Culture, and Techology Adoption," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 1506, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.
    6. Swee-Hoon Chuah, 2003. "Anthropology and Economic Imperialism: The Battlefield of Culture," Occasional Papers 4, Industrial Economics Division.
    7. Iyigun, Murat, 2008. "Lessons from the Ottoman Harem (On Ethnicity, Religion and War)," IZA Discussion Papers 3556, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Yaw Mensah, 2014. "An Analysis of the Effect of Culture and Religion on Perceived Corruption in a Global Context," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 255-282, May.
    9. Botticini, Maristella & Eckstein, Zvi, 2002. "From Farmers to Merchants: A Human Capital Interpretation of Jewish Economic History," IZA Discussion Papers 670, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Fletcher, Erin K. & Iyigun, Murat, 2009. "Cultures, Clashes and Peace," IZA Discussion Papers 4116, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Botticini, Maristella & Eckstein, Zvi, 2006. "From Farmers to Merchants, Voluntary Conversions and Diaspora: A Human Capital Interpretation of Jewish History," CEPR Discussion Papers 5571, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Alberto Chong & Jorge Guillen & Vanessa Rios, 2010. "Language nuances, trust and economic growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 191-208, April.
    13. James Foreman-Peck & Peng Zhou, 2013. "The strength and persistence of entrepreneurial cultures," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 163-187.
    14. Joao Ricardo Faria & Miguel A. Leon-Ledesma, 2004. "Habit formation, work ethics and technological progress," Manchester School, University of Manchester, pages 403-413.
    15. Taylor, Mark Zachary & Wilson, Sean, 2012. "Does culture still matter?: The effects of individualism on national innovation rates," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 234-247.
    16. Lopez-Claros, Augusto & Perotti, Valeria, 2014. "Does culture matter for development ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7092, The World Bank.
    17. Hun-Chang Lee, 2007. "The Political Economy of Pre-industrial Trade in Northeast Asia," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d07-219, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    18. Michael Huberman, 1999. "Shame and Guilt in Lancashire: Enforcing Piece Rate Contracts," CIRANO Working Papers 99s-14, CIRANO.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:57:y:1997:i:02:p:267-287_01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Keith Waters). General contact details of provider: http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_JEH .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.