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Labour Policy and Determinants of Employment and Wages in a Developing Economy with Labour Shortage

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  • Ibrahim Mohamed Abdalla
  • Mohammed A. Al-Waqfi
  • Nasri Harb
  • Rafiq H. Hijazi
  • Taoufik Zoubeidi

Abstract

Using data from a sample of 1,099 workers, this paper investigates the determinants of employment and wages for workers in the United Arab Emirates. The paper further examines the wage distribution and the decomposition of the wage gap between the public and the private sectors. Results of the study are consistent with the dual labour market theory and indicate that the labour market in the United Arab Emirates is segmented based on sectors (public versus private) and types of workers (nationals versus non-nationals). The study concludes with a discussion of the implication of these findings for the effectiveness of labour and economic policy. Copyright 2010 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Ibrahim Mohamed Abdalla & Mohammed A. Al-Waqfi & Nasri Harb & Rafiq H. Hijazi & Taoufik Zoubeidi, 2010. "Labour Policy and Determinants of Employment and Wages in a Developing Economy with Labour Shortage," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(2), pages 163-177, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:24:y:2010:i:2:p:163-177
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Elena Glinskaya & Michael Lokshin, 2007. "Wage differentials between the public and private sectors in India," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 333-355.
    2. Branko Jovanovic & Michael M. Lokshin, 2004. "Wage Differentials between the State and Private Sectors in Moscow," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 50(1), pages 107-123, March.
    3. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters,in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    5. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    6. Neuman, Shoshana & Silber, Jacques G, 1996. "Wage Discrimination across Ethnic Groups: Evidence from Israel," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(4), pages 648-661, October.
    7. Newell, Andrew & Reilly, Barry, 1996. "The gender wage gap in Russia: Some empirical evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 337-356, October.
    8. Dickens, William T & Lang, Kevin, 1985. "A Test of Dual Labor Market Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 792-805, September.
    9. Shoshana Neuman & Ronald Oaxaca, 2004. "Wage Decompositions with Selectivity-Corrected Wage Equations: A Methodological Note," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 2(1), pages 3-10, April.
    10. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, January.
    11. Leontaridi, Marianthi Rannia, 1998. " Segmented Labour Markets: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(1), pages 63-101, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rutledge, Emilie & Alkaabi, Khaled, 2017. "‘Private sector’ Emiratisation: job satisfaction and sociocultural influences," MPRA Paper 76931, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ryan, James Christopher, 2016. "Old knowledge for new impacts: Equity theory and workforce nationalization," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 1587-1592.

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